Cryptozoology – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:16:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Cryptozoology – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ 32 32 Lake Norman sea creature gets a name on new county park trail https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/lake-norman-sea-creature-gets-a-name-on-new-county-park-trail/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:16:18 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/lake-norman-sea-creature-gets-a-name-on-new-county-park-trail/ Catawba County has officially named one of the most visible trails in its new 606-acre Mountain Creek Park after a legendary Lake Norman sea creature that anglers and homeowners still report seeing roaming the waters. The park opens Saturday on the northwest tip of the lake in Sherrills Ford, about 35 miles north of Charlotte. […]]]>

Catawba County has officially named one of the most visible trails in its new 606-acre Mountain Creek Park after a legendary Lake Norman sea creature that anglers and homeowners still report seeing roaming the waters.

The park opens Saturday on the northwest tip of the lake in Sherrills Ford, about 35 miles north of Charlotte. Among its 19.52 miles of total trails is a 0.82 mile paved, ADA-accessible “easy” trail named Stormie Normie that winds 90 to 100 feet to a pier on the lake.

Stormie Normie is a child-friendly name for the legendary Loch Norman monster, park officials told The Charlotte Observer during a preview tour.

Sightings of a giant fish have been reported on the lake for decades, according to news outlets and a website dedicated to the legend.

With 520 miles of shoreline, Lake Norman spans parts of Mecklenburg, Iredell, Lincoln, and Catawba counties.

Park staff have been considering the names of the mountain bike trails, Catawba County spokeswoman Amy McCauley told the Observer this week.

The names “were inspired by the history, traditions and habitat associated with the location of Mountain Creek Park,” McCauley said in an email. “Because it’s a park, the names have also been infused with a bit of fun.”

fishing rodeo 07.JPG
Some think the legendary Lake Norman sea monster is just a gigantic catfish. Tim Isbell (Biloxi, Mississippi) Sun Herald file photo

‘What the fuck is this thing?’

Public interest in spotting the beast prompted cruises where passengers searched Lake Norman with binoculars.

In 2017, a film crew from the Japanese TV show “What’s This – Mysteries From Around the World” embarked on an unsuccessful three-day hunting expedition to find the beast, the Observer reported era.

Anglers and owners, however, continue to report sightings on LakeNormanMonster.com, a site that sells Normie t-shirts, mugs, beach blankets, posters, prints and a children’s book.

A crappie fisherman reported the last encounter on January 18.

“Could it have been Normie?” the Sherrills Ford man posted to the website after he said he saw ‘something sticking out of the water’ while fishing from a pier in Mountain Creek, at the northwest end of the lake in the Catawba County.

“But it was moving,” he said. “The head would go forward, then it would slow to a stop and go back. I was like, ‘what the hell is this freaking thing?!'”

The creature was brown and “about as big as a goose’s body, but it wasn’t a goose!” reports the fisherman. “It moved about 20ft then slowly descended. I was blown away by anything…and I’m not mad!!

His phone died the moment he tried to photograph the creature, he said.

“I saw it there too!” one person answered.

“I caught ginormous catfish. I was a fan of the idea of ​​something being mutated and genetically crossed into a different species,” another person replied.

“What did I just see? A monster?’

On July 31, 2021, while paddle boarding in Person’s Cove, an unnamed Denver, NC resident saw “a dark figure 6-8 feet just below the surface, about 10 feet from the shore”.

“A few parts were barely above water, then all of a sudden they splashed and went underwater,” the owner told LakeNormanMonster.com.

Five minutes later, “the same creature broke through the surface of the nearby water,” according to the report.

“What’s going on?” the person wondered. “What did I just see? A monster?”

“Dinosaur-Like Creature”

In July 2017, a 35-year-old man from Mecklenburg County told CryptoZoology.com that he spotted a “dinosaur-like creature” while traveling on a boat with friends, the Observer reported at the time.

The man described the creature as “splashing through water”, 10ft long and reminiscent of the mythical Loch Ness monster. It was visible for about a minute before sinking below the surface, he told the website.

Longnose Gar
The long-nosed gar bears a bite of nasty-looking teeth. The fish, which can grow to 5 or 6 feet long, roam Lake Norman, including near the new fishing pier in Mountain Creek Park, park rangers in Catawba County, North Carolina said. Michael Pearce File photo of the Wichita eagle (Kan.)

It’s just a gigantic fish, say skeptics

Skeptics say the monster is just an ordinary fish grown up.

The creature is likely a catfish that grew over 8 feet long, a Clemmons diver posted to LakeNormanMonster.com in 2017.

In response to a Denver, North Carolina resident’s post on the website, another person said the owner had probably seen a giant catfish, an alligator gar that can grow up to 10 feet long, or a long-nosed gar.

The longnose gar, which can reach 5 or 6 feet in length, definitely roams the lake, including near the new fishing pier in Mountain Creek Park, park officials told the Observer.

This story was originally published June 18, 2022 7 a.m.

Charlotte Observer Related Stories

Joe Marusak has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer since 1989, covering locals, towns and major news events in the area, and served as editor of the newspaper’s press office. He is currently reporting on the latest news.

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You Don’t Want To Miss These 8 Miniature Museums Across The United States https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/you-dont-want-to-miss-these-8-miniature-museums-across-the-united-states/ Thu, 26 May 2022 12:56:15 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/you-dont-want-to-miss-these-8-miniature-museums-across-the-united-states/ It only takes a road trip across the United States to realize how big this country can seem – in terms of physical space and diversity of ideas – and how small at the same time. Of course, scale is relative, but still there are some places so big or so small that they blur […]]]>

It only takes a road trip across the United States to realize how big this country can seem – in terms of physical space and diversity of ideas – and how small at the same time. Of course, scale is relative, but still there are some places so big or so small that they blur our sense of perception. If you cram every person on earth, they’d only fill a fraction of the Grand Canyon, as all 895,000 pre-1992 buildings across New York’s five boroughs are housed inside the Queens Museum of Art, a miniature metropolis built to a scale of 1:1200. In the middle of Kansas, a state known for its wide and flat vistas, you’ll find several great things besides a museum that straddles both ends of the size spectrum: The world’s largest collection of the world’s smallest versions of the largest big things.

Related
The artist behind a museum of miniature versions of ‘the world’s largest’ objects

While vast, sprawling collections of important art and artifacts like the Met or Smithsonian museums are essential stops on any road trip, here are 8 miniature museums that prove that sometimes it’s quality – not square footage. in square feet – of the exposure that matters.


1. The smallest museum in the world

Measuring just over 100 square feet, the world’s smallest museum displays ‘artifacts of ordinary life’, including a 1984 Compaq computer, a Beatles concert poster, a letter from John F. Kennedy, natural curiosities and the “largest jar of prehistoric artifacts in the world”. Puzzle Pieces.” Located in a small red shed behind the Buckboard City Cafe an hour east of Phoenix, Arizona, the world’s smallest museum is free, but donations are appreciated.


a small light green photo processing booth with a sign saying
The famous crochet museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan
dozens of crochet animals and figures sit on shelves
The famous crochet museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

2. World famous Crochet Museum

The World Famous Crochet Museum, owned by artist Shari Elf, is housed in a tiny former photo processing booth just outside Joshua Tree National Park. Elf has been collecting crochet items since the early 90s; after buying the photo booth, she built shelves to display her collection, painted it bright green, and moved it to Southern California. Elf is a curator, not a designer (she claims she can’t crochet), whose collection includes poodles, dolls, flowers, cats, waffles, a split banana, a full nativity scene, and even a (small) kitchen sink. The museum’s official curator is not Elf, but a crocheted alligator named Bunny, who reminds potential visitors that the free museum “is always open, even if we’re not there.”


a stuffed raccoon is dressed as dorothy from the wizard of oz on display in a store
Taxidermy at Eyegore. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

3. Eyegore Odditorium and Monster Museum

Eyegore’s Odditorium and Monster Museum is a new addition to Cawker City, Kansas, home to the world’s largest ball of string. Located directly across from the small town’s famous big attraction, Eyegore’s is part shop, part museum, and the home of Matt “Wizard of Odd” Alford and his wife, “Master of Monster Management”, Julie. The space is only officially open on weekends for now, but visitors are encouraged to call the couple; If they’re at home, they’ll probably be happy to show off their collection, which includes custom taxidermy pieces, ancient medical equipment, a full human skeleton and what they believe to be Kansas’ biggest pants.


a shrunken head on display in a museum
A shrunken head in the Gunnison collection. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan
an ornate three-story gray stone building with a green rotunda and a clock on top
The Akin Free Library. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

4. The Olive Gunnison Collection

The crown jewel of Akin’s Free Library’s eclectic archives is easy to miss – you’ll have to descend into the building’s basement to see Olive M. Gunnison’s curious collection. Gunnison began collecting insects, mice and worms as a child, then moved on to preserving her own specimens. The mother and housewife kept her burgeoning collection in a shed behind her house, dubbed a ‘chamber of horrors’ by her husband, until it was donated to the library in Pawling, New York, in 1960. Currently, Gunnison’s collection occupies four rooms, divided into two sections: one devoted to natural history and a cabinet of curiosities. The museum includes dozens of taxidermy specimens, a shrunken head from Ecuador, the footprints of a dinosaur captured in stone, uranium ore and a mammoth tooth.

Related
A collection of world-class curiosities slowly evaporates in a dusty basement


a city street with open doors leading to a museum in an old elevator
The Mmuseum. | Photo: Wikimedia Commons

5. Mmuseumm

First opened in 2012 in a downtown Manhattan elevator shaft, the 36-square-foot Mmuseumm is currently located in Cortlandt Alley, just south of Canal Street. Dedicated to “object journalism”, the Mmuseumm website presents it as “a new type of museum, growing in a network of expected and unexpected places, dedicated to the exploration of modern humanity and current events. through the revelation of objects from around the world”. Old items on display included a first-generation iPod, artwork created by prisoners, and a broken lava lamp. The Mmuseumm is temporarily closed but the collection is visible 24/7 through an observation window.


a row of bonsai is displayed outside
National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

6. National Bonsai and Penjing Museum

Located less than 3 miles east of the US Capitol and the National Mall, and nestled in the middle of the 446-acre US National Arboretum, is a small museum of small trees with a long history: the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. The mission of the free outdoor museum is to educate future generations about the ancient art of bonsai. Featuring over 100 specimens, the collection is divided by region of origin and includes trees from Japan, China and North America, many of which are centuries old.

Related
The National Bonsai Museum may be tiny, but it represents centuries of history


a bigfoot statue stands under a sign for the cryptozoology and paranormal museum
Museum of Cryptozoology and the Paranormal. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

7. Cryptozoology and Paranormal Museum

After he and his family moved from Long Island to Littleton, North Carolina, former New York journalist Stephen Barcelo began to suspect that their historic home was haunted. Today, the ground floor of their house houses the Museum of Cryptozoology and the Paranormal. One room is dedicated to the paranormal, including several haunted dolls, tombstone carvings, an old wooden coffin, and shrunken heads; the other is dedicated to cryptids, with plaster casts of Bigfoot footprints and other evidence of the mythical creatures’ existence. One of the most popular items sold by Barcelo is a complete Bigfoot go-bag for those doing their own research; Barcelo and his daughter Holly also run ghost tours and conduct paranormal investigations around the country.

Related
This former New York journalist turned his haunted house into a museum


a sign hanging from a brick building reads
The Pocket Museum has no address. | Photo: Caroline Eubanks

8. Hattiesburg Pocket Museum

When Mississippi’s Hattiesburg Pocket Museum opened in August 2020, the museum had no address or phone number. Today, a search will take you to an adjacent street, but visitors still have to find the right alley themselves, and that’s part of the fun. On busy weekends, you might be able to follow the crowds or ask someone to show you the way, like at a speakeasy. The museum itself, consisting of a window with shelves, is just part of the Pocket Museum experience, which includes several large-scale murals, a theater made from a modified ViewMaster, and a art gallery created in a former newsstand. Visitors can scan QR codes to get more information about exhibits and submit their own pieces for the exhibition.


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Mothman Prophecies – The cosmic horror movie is still thrilling 20 years later https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/mothman-prophecies-the-cosmic-horror-movie-is-still-thrilling-20-years-later/ Mon, 16 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/mothman-prophecies-the-cosmic-horror-movie-is-still-thrilling-20-years-later/ Babysitting is arguably the most dangerous after-school job in the world of young adult horror. The caregivers in these books consider themselves lucky if the biggest problem of the night is getting the kids to bed. These less fortunate assistants have to deal with a variety of boogeymen. While not every waking second in these […]]]>

Babysitting is arguably the most dangerous after-school job in the world of young adult horror. The caregivers in these books consider themselves lucky if the biggest problem of the night is getting the kids to bed. These less fortunate assistants have to deal with a variety of boogeymen. While not every waking second in these teenagers’ lives is a total nightmare; their own homes and schools are temporary refuges. A.Bateson the other hand, found a way to ensure that a babysitter is in a constant state of terror. In the author’s 1991 novel Help for the mother, a 17-year-old accepts a high-paying but unusual job offer; she is hired to babysit full time. The only catch is that the nanny job requires you to stay on a small island, far from home… and always close to danger.

Rebecca “Becky” Collier finds an excuse to leave Seattle for the summer after her boyfriend dumps her for her best friend. And with her leaving for college soon, the soon-to-be freshman needs to make some quick cash. So when Mrs. Nelson provides a stone for two birds, Becky hops on a plane to Sebastian Island. The gig itself – watching over a little boy named Devon all summer – is easy enough, but after a while Becky tires of Devon’s demanding mother.

Mrs. Nelson is visibly uncomfortable with her own son, and she is reluctant to let Becky leave the house. Making things stranger is why the Nelsons are in Sebastian in the first place. Someone has threatened Devon, and his parents – Devon’s father has been away all this time – think keeping him here is the best option. As eager as Becky is to ignore all the red flags for a mouth-watering $5,000 lump sum, the growing isolation eats away at her. On top of that, there’s the handsome but suspicious townsman and neighbor, Cleve Davidson, who keeps asking Becky so many prying questions.

Once she gets the night off, Becky’s mind starts racing. Along with the sheriff’s convenient accident, which effectively leaves the town of South End without any law enforcement, Becky questions Cleve’s innocence. His incessant curiosity about Becky’s work and her “aunt” suggests that he is not who he appears to be. Ms. Nelson herself is just as dodgy, if not more so. She not only forbids Becky from answering the phone in her office when she’s not home – a room Bates compares to the forbidden one in the French folktale “Bluebeard” – her daily work meetings are nothing plus she’s sitting alone at the marina. For someone who claims to be hiding, Mrs. Nelson really doesn’t know how to stay hidden.

From Becky feeling like a prisoner in the Nelsons’ summer home to her growing anxiety about Devon’s stalker, Help for the mother is all about the horrors within. Becky suffers the effects of cabin fever early on; her irritability and paranoia cause her to make rash decisions as the story progresses. Then, being aware of Devon’s predicament makes Becky suspicious and nervous. The more she gets entangled in the Nelson problem, the more she internalizes their fears.

When it comes to scares, Bates largely channels the psychological menace of classic “women in peril” movies as opposed to the teenage slashers influencing other suspenseful YA novels from the same era. She plays on Becky’s dread with a phone that keeps ringing but not answering, and she perpetuates the feeling of being watched. At one point, the author terrorizes the protagonist with strategically placed dolls; some are broken and mangled, while the most fearsome of them all is completely unscathed. A great line about this incident sums up Becky’s uneasy state of mind:

“This doll was perfect – no cuts, no broken, broken heads, no torn limbs – and somehow it was even scarier.

Almost like it was a blank threat, Becky thought. Fill it with anything I can imagine.

Family thrillers were all the rage in Hollywood when Help for the mother was first published. Sinister guardians, abandoned lovers, and bad seeds were just some of the threats found in these now dated accounts. Regardless of how they did it, the would-be villains sought to destroy the family. This book predates the cinematic peak of the subgenre, which includes The hand that rocks the cradle, poison ivyand mother’s boys. Unlike those movies, however, Bates’ story details the aftermath of a crime. Of course this facet is not realized until the last act.

Mrs. Nelson eventually gives in to Becky’s questions and admits that she is running away from Franklin, her abusive husband. The women devise a plan in anticipation of Franklin’s arrival; Becky hides the baby elsewhere while Mrs. Nelson distracts her husband. As expected, things don’t go as planned. This is due to Mrs. Nelson lying about everything. Devon is not his child; he is the biological son of Franklin and his current wife. Becky’s client took the baby and then fled to this island, where she put everything, including the rental house and the checking account, in the nanny’s name. And to make sure he wouldn’t alert the proper authorities, Ms. Nelson hurt the sheriff and let the town think Cleve was responsible.

Caroline B. Cooney exercised the “stolen baby” plotline a year earlier in her Janie Johnson series, beginning with The face on the milk carton. However, Help for the mother executes the idea very differently. The result is a greater shock to the target audience, as the twist is delivered near the end rather than at the beginning as in Cooney’s book. Young readers identify with Becky, who, like them, would never suspect a mother lying about being a parent. The thriller plays with perception as well as the concept of who can be considered inherently trustworthy. That Becky would then become an accomplice to a kidnapping, albeit without her knowledge or consent, is appalling.

Despite being manipulated, lied to, and nearly killed, Becky remains compassionate. She understands that Mrs. Nelson needs a different kind of help now. As she confronts the woman at the marina, Becky is sympathetic instead of angry. She eventually lets Mrs. Nelson escape and tells her to “be safe”. Letting the antagonist, especially someone with a mental illness, live in these kinds of stories is both merciful and uncommon. It’s also not the most logical or even legal choice to make, but it suits Becky, a character whose fatal flaw is caring too much.


There was a time when the children’s section of bookstores was overflowing with horror and suspense. These books were easily identifiable by their flashy fonts and garish covers. This notable subgenre of YA fiction flourished in the 80s, peaked in the 90s, and then finally came to an end in the early 2000s. YA horror of this genre is indeed a thing of the past, but the stories endure at buried in a book. This recurring column reflects the nostalgic novels that still haunt readers decades later.

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From Loch Ness to the Essex Serpent, why are humans so eager to invent sea monsters? | Folklore and mythology https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/from-loch-ness-to-the-essex-serpent-why-are-humans-so-eager-to-invent-sea-monsters-folklore-and-mythology/ Sun, 08 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/from-loch-ness-to-the-essex-serpent-why-are-humans-so-eager-to-invent-sea-monsters-folklore-and-mythology/ As a boy, I believed in the Loch Ness Monster so implicitly that I asked my father to drive us from Southampton to Scotland to see it. The night before, in a dream, I saw his form meandering through the swamps by the lake. I was terrified. The next day the large gray waters remained […]]]>

As a boy, I believed in the Loch Ness Monster so implicitly that I asked my father to drive us from Southampton to Scotland to see it. The night before, in a dream, I saw his form meandering through the swamps by the lake. I was terrified.

The next day the large gray waters remained untouched by a serpentine neck, but that did nothing to dispel my belief. I filled an empty bottle with Loch Ness water, took it home to put it in the cupboard under the stairs and waited for tiny plesiosaurs to hatch.

Humanity can’t stand much reality, as TS Eliot said, so we’re reimagining the monsters already in our heads. This week sees the screening of the TV series based on the Sarah Perry novel, The Essex Serpent, a Victorian resurrection of the legend of a chimerical aquatic beast believed to emerge from swamps in search of human prey. Perry’s story is based on the idea that something strange could exist in the space between us and infinity – the “thin places” of Celtic myth.

Sarah Perry. Photograph: Graeme Robertson/The Guardian

In fact, our notions of residual monsters may have a lot to do with how the Celts were hunted to the far reaches of the British Isles, into bays, lochs and islands, which seemed to retain these beliefs as gestures of defiance. In the 1940s, a BBC radio producer, David Thomson, traveled to Scotland and Ireland in search of selkies, mythical shape-shifting seals. He treated them not as tall tales, but as cultural artifacts, believing that the stories he recorded were “the last remnants of pagan belief, before the nuclear world arose”.

In 1937, a remarkable survey of the schools of Ireland had sought to catalog this folklore. It was a strange version of Mass Observation, an affirmation of a new republican state. “Is there a story told in your district of a snake or some large animal that lives in a certain lake or river there?” the children were asked. “Are we talking about water horses or water bulls? Are there stories of strange animals encountered on the roads at night? One boy said water horses come out of Drumcor Lough at night to feed, then return to the lake and turn into animals like eels. “Customs and beliefs in a conservative country like ours”, concludes the survey, “originate from the Bronze Age as well as from the early Christian period”.

It’s no wonder the first reports of a monster in Loch Ness came from Irish missionary St Columba, who ordered the beast to refrain from attacking a swimmer in 564 AD.

In the 1930s reports of Nessie poured in, spurred by increased tourism and access to the shores of the loch, but also by the Great Depression during which the escape was a reaction to social and economic distress . Even Virginia Woolf was forced to record a visit to the loch in 1938 when she met a lovely couple “who were in contact with the monster. They had seen it. He is like several broken telegraph poles and swims at immense speed. He has no head. He is constantly seen.

He still is. Last week a couple staying in Scotland posted a video showing a 5m long creature with one fin swimming in the loch. This story came as a sort of antidote to the terrible news of the war in Ukraine. In the 1970s, sea monsters, yetis and aliens also appeared in a threatened world, whose wilderness was rapidly shrinking and human lives were overtaken by technology.

HMS Daedalus sights a sea serpent.
HMS Daedalus sights a sea serpent. Photography: Aliyah

In the great extinction, we were left with only the dragons of our unconscious, as Carl Jung said. Perry’s novel has its counterpart in that of Iris Murdoch The sea, the sea from 1978, in which a theater director retires to a rocky shore where he sees, in broad daylight, a sea serpent emerging mischievously from the waves. “I could see the sky through its spirals,” he said, horrified. Dublin-born Murdoch had a fascination with the weird and a mischievous nature, a sensibility evident in folkloric horror films of the time; a psychosexual terror expressed in the juxtaposition of flower-print crinolines and cryptozoological creatures.

The Victorians were obsessed with sea serpents; it was the dark side of their moral certainty. The characters in The Essex Serpent state that the coming of the beast is a punishment for their sins or a symptom of their times, while the main character, Cora Seaborne, believes it to be a surviving dinosaur. Darwin’s theories had raised such uncertainties; and while the poet Matthew Arnold wrote of the “melancholy, long, withdrawn roar” of the Sea of ​​Faith, the newspapers published earnest reports of sea monsters all over the empire. Most famous of all was the creature seen in the South Atlantic in 1848 by the crew of HMS Daedalus. “An enormous snake, with head and shoulders held constantly four feet above the surface of the sea” seen in the presence of officers of Her Majesty’s Royal Navy gave the beast delightful credence.

In our troubled times, the sea retains its power to contain the unknown. Jung saw the sea as the repository of our collective unconscious; Jean-Paul Sartre thought his thin green film was designed to deceive people. Scientists estimate that we have only identified a third of the species in the deep ocean yet.

Whales and basking sharks swimming just below the surface can look like multi-humped beasts, and the monster Daedalus is now thought to have been a sei whale, an almost agonizing mammal, albeit 20 meters long. And in a nod to Freudian phallic symbolism, other sightings of sea serpents have been attributed to whales rolling on their backs and expelling their stupendous penises.

But I refuse to give in entirely to such earthly rationality. A respected whale scientist once told me that his colleague had seen a large, unidentified serpentine animal out at sea, almost the length of the ship he was on. As long as these reports continue to come in, I will keep the faith. This bottle is still under our stairs.

Philip Hoare’s book Albert & the Whale is published in paperback by 4th Estate

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The Loch Ness Monster video: “The best pictures in decades!” Or another newspaper? | life and style https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/the-loch-ness-monster-video-the-best-pictures-in-decades-or-another-newspaper-life-and-style/ Mon, 02 May 2022 19:03:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/the-loch-ness-monster-video-the-best-pictures-in-decades-or-another-newspaper-life-and-style/ Name: The Loch Ness monster. Known affectionately as: Nessie. Age: The earliest account of a monster in the Loch Ness region appears in Columba’s Life of Saint Adomnán of Iona, written in the 6th century AD. This would give the monster at least 1,500 years old. Unless the current one, assuming one exists, is one […]]]>

Name: The Loch Ness monster.

Known affectionately as: Nessie.

Age: The earliest account of a monster in the Loch Ness region appears in Columba’s Life of Saint Adomnán of Iona, written in the 6th century AD. This would give the monster at least 1,500 years old.

Unless the current one, assuming one exists, is one descending of Adomnan. This would presumably mean that there are more than one at any given time, for breeding purposes.

And since the sixth century of our era? Things quieted down a bit on the loch until the early 1870s when a Dr Mackenzie saw a log-shaped object “wiggling and coming up the water”. This was followed by sightings of “a big animal with stubby legs”, a “fish resembling a whale” and a “most extraordinary animal form” crossing the road. By the 1930s, the legend of Nessie was world famous, with tales, sightings and photos appearing sporadically ever since.

Any proof? Scientists remain skeptical, attributing the sightings to wishful thinking, hoaxes and genuine newspapers. An ecology professor has suggested images of a ‘tentacled, alien’ creature could be a whale’s penis during mating season.

So just a big dick pic, basically. He definitely doesn’t have the same romance. Yet it hasn’t put off enthusiasts, cryptozoologists and souvenir shops.

I guess there was a recent sighting. Yes. A new video and photos taken by a married couple from their holiday home overlooking the loch. They want to remain anonymous, but she said, “It was something big… He was propelling himself with something. You can see it much more clearly than it came out in the photos. Bumps or bumps or whatever disappeared underwater, but they still pushed forward underwater.

It sure looks like Nessie. What size? Between six and nine meters (20 feet to 30 feet) long, they calculate.

Any experts looked at it? Gary Campbell called it a believable sighting, the best footage he’s seen in decades.

And It is? Keeper of the Official Loch Ness Monster Register. It has been recording sightings for 26 years.

Or observation logs for 26 years. Stop that. He said: “In terms of video evidence, there have been two or three very good videos in the past, but this one is definitely among the best.”

It looks great; I need to see this video … Oh! Is that right?! This little V wake in the water? Well, she said it was better in real life, remember?

I’m thinking of a pair of little waterfowl. Maybe that’s why they wanted to remain anonymous.

Say: It’s a picture of a duck.

Do not tell : I preferred the photo of the dick.

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5 Best Cryptozoology Channels, Blogs, Podcasts for Mythical Monsters and Cryptids https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/5-best-cryptozoology-channels-blogs-podcasts-for-mythical-monsters-and-cryptids/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/5-best-cryptozoology-channels-blogs-podcasts-for-mythical-monsters-and-cryptids/ Big Foot. Loch Ness. Yeti. chupacabra. Mokele-mbembe. There are legends about several elusive creatures whose existence has never been scientifically proven. These are called cryptids, and the study of these “hidden animals” is known as cryptozoology. For more on famous and less famous cryptids, check out these YouTube channels, blogs, and podcasts. Cryptozoology is pseudoscience, […]]]>

Big Foot. Loch Ness. Yeti. chupacabra. Mokele-mbembe. There are legends about several elusive creatures whose existence has never been scientifically proven. These are called cryptids, and the study of these “hidden animals” is known as cryptozoology. For more on famous and less famous cryptids, check out these YouTube channels, blogs, and podcasts.

Cryptozoology is pseudoscience, however, and we’re not saying these creatures actually exist. Treat it as fiction or treat it as plausible reality is up to you. What you can’t deny is that it’s fascinating and interesting to learn more about the monsters that roam the very Earth than we do.

1. TREY The Explainer (YouTube): Best Intro Videos for Cryptids and Cryptozoology


TREY The Explainer is one of the best cryptozoology YouTube channels with the fascinating Cryptid Profile series for quick explanations of popular creatures

Trey Swenton covers cryptozoology, paleontology, zoology, and biology on his excellent YouTube channel in a way that any average person can understand. Above all, Trey is not a myth follower and tries to assess every claim with a healthy skepticism that newcomers to cryptology will appreciate.

The best videos to start with come from the Cryptid Profile series, where Trey dives deep into one creature at a time. The information in the video comes from renowned researchers, books, online discussions, and declassified documents, and put together in a single, cohesive video. If you want a quick briefing on a cryptid, your first stop should be to check if it’s been featured in Trey’s Cryptid Profile series.

If you like the Cryptid Profile series and are also fascinated by dinosaurs, check out his Paleo Profile series. And the Speculative Evolution series is a fun look at the monsters of mythology and popular culture, like the science of dragons, Godzilla, and the anthropology of Game of Thrones. Besides cryptids and dinosaurs, Trey tackles popular conspiracy theory topics such as aliens, evolution, mythology, and more. in other videos.

2. Monsters Among Us (Podcast): Stories of People Who Have Seen Cryptids


Derek Hayes' Monsters Among Us Podcast Asks People To Call Eyewitness Encounters Of Cryptids And Paranormal Beings

Myths and legends around cryptids come from humans. It all starts when someone sees or hears something they can’t explain and then talks about it with others. The story is what matters, and Monsters Among Us tries to collect it straight from the source.

Host Derek Hayes asks listeners to call out the show with their own paranormal encounters with monsters and cryptids. Each episode contains around three or four stories which include popular cryptids like Mothman and sasquatch as well as little known inexplicable creatures.

Monsters Among Us is now in its 13th season, with previous seasons having at least 20 episodes each. So there are tons of stories to listen to. But given the show’s longevity, it naturally expanded from simple cryptids to all sorts of paranormal encounters like ghosts, unexplainable phenomena, and more.

You can also email or call Monsters Among Us to tell your own story, via a five-minute voicemail or other types of submissions you’ll find on the official site. Hayes also provides links to topics covered in each episode on the show notes of his website.

Listen to Monsters Among Us on any podcast app

3. Malcolm’s Musings (Web): In-depth blog posts and translations on cryptozoology


Malcolm Smith's blog, Malcolm's Musings, offers detailed translations and in-depth articles on famous and little-known cryptids.

Zoologist Malcolm Smith is the author of several books on cryptozoology, including the definitive paper on Australian cryptids. Through his blog, he turns his attention to other monsters around the world, such as BigFoot variants, sea serpents, and other strange creatures.

Smith is a polyglot and uses his skills to translate articles on cryptids from other languages. Through excerpts from local newspapers from different countries, dispatches and journals, and books in foreign languages, he has amassed an enviable section of eyewitness accounts and descriptions of cryptids that you won’t find anywhere else on the internet. Apart from translations, he also writes expert articles on known cryptids through meticulous research from different sources.

The best place to start reading is the site’s helpful index. Smith has divided his collection into translations, classic cases, alien big cats, sea serpents (as well as lake monsters), miscellaneous, and a special section on abominable snowmen or bigfoots. There’s also an excellent two-part article on the myth of the giant squid, which delves into a myriad of cases that make this monster more fascinating than imagined in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

4. Shuker Nature (Web): Insightful analysis by a leading crypto expert


Dr. Karl Shuker's blog, ShukerNature, analyzes and examines cryptozoology with a keen scientific temperament and meticulous research

British zoologist Dr. Karl Shuker is one of the world’s foremost experts on cryptids and other strange animals. He has written several books on these topics, is a consultant to Guinness World Records, and strives to bring a scientific temperament to the pursuit of cryptozoology.

On his blog, ShukerNature, Dr. Shuker reviews books on cryptids, examines and analyzes new and old claims, and also writes in-depth articles on possible cryptids through his research. Despite being an academic, the writing style on the blog is conversational and keeps things simple for the layman to understand.

Dr. Shuker’s extensive research also gives him access to a wide variety of images, which you won’t easily find on other parts of the web. In fact, if you scour the full blog index, look for posts titled “A ShukerNature Photo of the Day.” Many of the posts include interesting illustrations, which Dr. Shuker often analyzes and debunks by citing the lore and context around the image.

For an idea of ​​what to expect on ShukerNature, check out their article on Chinese Phoenix Feng-Huang. This piece encapsulates Dr. Shuker’s detailed research, his ability to draw material from a variety of sources, and the use of images to deepen his narrative.


The Encyclopedia of Cryptozoology is a large publicly editable Wiki directory of all unknown cryptids and animals

The Encyclopedia of Cryptozoology (EoC) is the closest thing you’ll get to a Wikipedia of all cryptids. Anyone can contribute and edit this directory of 444 unknown or mythical animals, which also contains 250 other articles of related material like cryptozoologists, hoaxes, cryptobotany, etc.

On each cryptid’s page, you’ll find a detailed account of everything you want to know about them. Usually the page lists the best descriptions through eyewitness accounts and paintings, a timeline of when and where she was sighted (often with large excerpts from autobiographies and diaries), leads to physical evidence (including including photographs, audio recordings and artifacts), and theories about its existence (including possible hoaxes).

You can browse the cryptid directory by country or by region or by type of animal. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can even try random items to descend down a rabbit hole of exotic creatures. The “Featured Articles” section also has some great reads. The EoC homepage also tracks cryptozoology news and blogs, making it a good place to find updates on anyone’s research.

Cryptozoology today, zoology tomorrow

Due to its very nature of being scientifically unproven, cryptozoology should be viewed with a skeptical eye. These stories are fascinating, the creatures intriguing, but as long as they are not proven, they must be taken with a grain of salt; but not with mockery or disrespect.

In the past, cryptids have proven true. Dr. Shucker makes an important point when he speaks of the inherent disadvantage of cryptozoology, saying, “Cryptozoology can never win, for as soon as one of its subjects is confirmed to be real, he is not more cryptozoological but zoological instead.”


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A Yeti head and Bigfoot footprints will be on display at the new Bangor store https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/a-yeti-head-and-bigfoot-footprints-will-be-on-display-at-the-new-bangor-store/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 10:04:07 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/a-yeti-head-and-bigfoot-footprints-will-be-on-display-at-the-new-bangor-store/ The International Museum of Cryptozoology just opened its new Bangor outpost on Hammond Street this week, after announcing the bookstore and gift shop last fall, and Bigfoot hunters, paranormal enthusiasts and simple curious have already stopped to visit. Cryptozoologist Loren Coleman, executive director of the nonprofit organization that runs Portland’s flagship museum and now Bangor […]]]>

The International Museum of Cryptozoology just opened its new Bangor outpost on Hammond Street this week, after announcing the bookstore and gift shop last fall, and Bigfoot hunters, paranormal enthusiasts and simple curious have already stopped to visit.

Cryptozoologist Loren Coleman, executive director of the nonprofit organization that runs Portland’s flagship museum and now Bangor location, stocked the shop with artifacts, specimens and curiosities, as well as books and gifts and archives full of thousands of Coleman’s books on cryptozoology and related subjects, which people will be able to visit by appointment and which will open later this year.

A selection of books available at the new bookstore at the International Museum of Cryptozoology on Hammond Street in Bangor. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik / BDN

“We were hoping to have been open for Halloween last year, but we really wanted to do it right and find some really unique items for Bangor,” Coleman said. “We wanted to find artifacts that really spoke to this region.”

Some of the most eye-catching things on display in the shop include Frosty, a huge sculpture of a yeti head that’s mounted on the wall, and a replica of the Minnesota Iceman – a six-foot hairy hominid believed to have been originally found. in Vietnam – whose supposedly frozen body was displayed across the country throughout the 1960s.

There’s also a Fiji mermaid, a cryptid hoax popularized by PT Barnum, a selection of stuffed animals, and many smaller items, like casts of supposed Bigfoot footprints, and even a small version of the Cherryfield Goatman, a half-human, half-goat wearing a flannel shirt, reportedly spotted in the Washington County town in the 1950s.

Clockwise from left: A replica of the Minnesota Iceman is on display at the International Museum of Cryptozoology Bookstore on Hammond Street in Bangor; Frosty, a large, custom-made yeti head, is mounted on a wall; A book about the mysterious Bigfoot. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik / BDN

Coleman has studied cryptids, the term for an animal whose existence is unproven, for nearly five decades. He has written more than 40 books on various cryptozoological topics, has consulted, and been interviewed for movies, TV shows, and documentaries.

It opened its first museum in Portland in 2003. Since then it has expanded twice, first on Congress Street and then to a much larger space at the Thompson’s Point development on the River Fore in 2016. last year, Coleman bought the building at 585 Hammond St. in Bangor, and also bought a house on the West Side of Bangor, which he and his wife moved to earlier this year after selling their Portland home.

Now that Coleman and his wife, Jennifer, are new residents of Bangor, he looks forward to getting more involved in the community. The shop has previously partnered with Bangor’s SK Tours, Stephen King-themed Bangor tours led by Jamie Tinker, to bring guests to the shop when it’s open.

Holden’s Chuck Seger snaps a photo inside the bookstore at the International Cryptozoology Museum on Hammond Street in Bangor on Friday. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik / BDN

“We’ve already seen a lot of people who are interested in what we’re doing out here coming out of the woodwork,” he said. “I’m excited to meet more people in the community.”

The store will only be open from noon to 5 p.m. on Fridays during April so that staff have time to add a few extra details to the space, but from May Coleman plans to extend the hours. throughout the weekend.

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This student society is looking for sasquatch in the swamps https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/this-student-society-is-looking-for-sasquatch-in-the-swamps/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/this-student-society-is-looking-for-sasquatch-in-the-swamps/ Sabrina Marie hovers over a pile of excrement, trying to figure out who left her there. She suspects a dog or a raccoon and is quick to rule out that it’s sasquatch droppings. “I guess it would be a lot bigger than that,” she said. Mary would know. She is the social media manager for […]]]>

Sabrina Marie hovers over a pile of excrement, trying to figure out who left her there. She suspects a dog or a raccoon and is quick to rule out that it’s sasquatch droppings.

“I guess it would be a lot bigger than that,” she said.

Mary would know. She is the social media manager for the Trent University Sasquatch Society, an official club that has some 140 “squatchers”. He is registered with the school’s student union, sandwiched between other groups like the Trent Conservatives, the badminton club, and Model UN.

“I was really interested in otherworldly things and cryptozoology, so I thought this was a great opportunity,” said Marie, a fourth-year biology student at the school, located in Peterborough, Ontario, 68 kilometers northeast of Toronto.

The company, now about a year old, is dedicated to finding signs of the mythical beast. The sasquatch, also known as Bigfoot, has long been mentioned in Aboriginal oral history. It is often depicted as a giant hairy ape-like mammal, walking upright in the forests mostly of the Pacific Northwest, but ignored by scientists.

The members of the society go on an exploration, trudging through the woods to follow the advice they receive. There’s also a learning element, online meetings for weekly Q&As with researchers and sasquatch enthusiasts like the cast of Animal Planet’s Finding Bigfoot series.

Marie and Adam wade through the swampy waters outside of Peterborough, Ontario. “The benefit of a swamp for Bigfoot is that humans don’t usually travel through swamps because they’re not pleasant to walk on,” Marie said. (Haydn Watters/CBC)

The group recently searched a marsh outside Peterborough, where club founder and chairman Ryan Willis learned that mysterious footprints had been found.

He brings a stick, to bang on the trees and try to get a response to as well as a portable Bigfoot noise maker, to reference any howls, sniffles, roars, or moans he can hear. His eyes are open for oversized tracks or peculiar tree structures.

“A lot of the experts we talk to say you should keep going back to the same areas,” he said.

“That does not make any sense”

Willis, a fourth-year Canadian Studies student at Trent, has long been obsessed with the tradition of sasquatch and Bigfoot.

“I probably prefer [to call it] sasquatch because I think it sounds pretty professional. Sometimes you say Bigfoot and people say, ‘Ha ha, Bigfoot.'”

But he hasn’t spotted anything suspicious yet – and the recent search of the swamps hasn’t turned up anything either. It’s no surprise to Trent anthropology professor Eugene Morin, who scoffs at the idea that sasquatchs walk in any forest.

“In terms of ecology, it makes no sense,” he said.

Willis hopes to receive invitations to conduct research in more saquatchy areas than Ontario. “One of our goals is to make it more talked about in academia,” he says. (Haydn Watters/CBC)

Morin explains that a pool of partners is needed to sustain a population of mammals. He says if the sasquatch existed, there would have been many more sightings and evidence of companions, especially given their supposed size.

“I think it’s fun,” he said of the company’s mission. “It’s probably entertaining but it’s like UFOs…I think UFOs in my opinion are more likely to be [real].”

5:06This student society is looking for swamps for sasquatches

This is not an April Fool’s joke. A group of students from Peterborough, Ontario are looking for sasquatch. They even formed an official student club at Trent University. Haydn Watters followed a recent search in a swamp.

This does not discourage Willis. He wonders why people who claim to have seen something would risk speaking out.

“There’s a lot of stigma around coming out and saying you saw a sasquatch,” he said.

Talking to those who have had encounters makes you believe so. It’s murkier for other members of the company, like Allison Adam, a third-year business student who recently joined.

“I’m not ruling it out…I might have to see one to be really sure,” she said.

No reports? Don’t bother looking

Matthew Moneymaker, one of the animators of Finding Bigfoot, was intrigued when asked to speak to the group Trent. He knows of only one other school society dedicated to the search for the legendary beast, at a university in Virginia. He hopes they take off in more places.

“All these kids are really into it. They’re having a lot of fun,” said Moneymaker, founder and president of the US-based Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization.

He admits that Ontario isn’t the most “squatchi” place and encourages Trent students to stick to places where sightings have been reported.

Willis received this Bigfoot noisemaker from his father as a Christmas present. His parents think his sasquatch-finding adventures are “pretty cool”. “They’ve known I’ve been interested for a long time,” he says. (Haydn Watters/CBC)

“Randomly going out, looking in the woods around campus, it’s like it’s ridiculous,” he said. “I hope this group can organize themselves enough to know where the closest reports are and that they can hang out there at night, like I did in law school.”

Willis wants other schools to start their own chapters of the Sasquatch Society and bring more of it to academia. As he prepares to graduate, he hopes to travel to places with more sasquatch reports, like British Columbia, Oregon and California.

“I would like to continue to do everything I can with it and go as far as I can.”

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April Fool’s Day 2022: The Gareth Bale Bridge and the Wild Haggis Hunt | Newspapers https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/april-fools-day-2022-the-gareth-bale-bridge-and-the-wild-haggis-hunt-newspapers/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 17:20:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/april-fools-day-2022-the-gareth-bale-bridge-and-the-wild-haggis-hunt-newspapers/ For for most people, April Fool’s Day is either a beacon of hope in dark times or a tedious parade of bad jokes we could all do without, with nothing in between. With a pandemic and a global focus on conflict in Ukraine and elsewhere, judging the tone of a decent April Fool’s Day has […]]]>

For for most people, April Fool’s Day is either a beacon of hope in dark times or a tedious parade of bad jokes we could all do without, with nothing in between. With a pandemic and a global focus on conflict in Ukraine and elsewhere, judging the tone of a decent April Fool’s Day has become much more difficult for businesses, and even more so for news outlets battling a growing wave of misinformation on social networks.

For the Telegraph, the big April Fool’s Day news was a plan by the Cricket Board of England and Wales to ditch the dreary and unsuccessful England men’s cricket team defeated in the West Indies and wholesale replace it with Heather Knight’s World Cup finalists.

The Mirror reported that mud from the ill-fated Marble Arch burial mound was to be used to rebuild Hadrian’s Wall as part of the government’s ‘upgrading’ programme. Wales Online, meanwhile, suggested the Second Severn Crossing should be renamed after Welsh footballer Gareth Bale.

You may have spotted our dedicated maritime correspondent Mari Tyme implausibly reporting that Tory MPs have been lobbying Downing Street to allow the Royal Family to use a recently seized Russian superyacht as their new flagship royal yacht.

ITV’s Good Morning Britain attempted to prank viewers by having weather presenter Laura Tobin broadcast live what was presented to her as a unique plant that had been specially bred and was to be named in her honour.

Elsewhere there was exciting news for those interested in cryptozoology, as the Scottish Deer Center in Fife announced it had caught a wild haggis, a mythical creature long thought extinct. The animal, which is certainly not some sort of wig-wearing guinea pig, had apparently left telltale footprints around the valleys near the Lomond Hills. The Deer Center has built a special habitat for the delicious little furball.

Fusion food might be a little old fashioned these days, but the British are ruining Italian food, it’s timeless. The pasta evangelists claimed to be adding a mash-up featuring the nation’s favorite Sunday meal to their delivery lineup to produce Sunday Roasted Spaghetti. Pink Marmalade, which truly makes a color-changing gin, is also making a strenuous step into Italian foods, claiming to have launched three new pizza-flavored gins, including a pepperoni gin that promises “unmistakable meaty taste and a burst of vibrations to take away in every pour”.

A delicious bowl of Sunday roast spaghetti. Photograph: The Pasta Evangelists

The rising cost of living in the UK has caused some people to call Friday not April Fool’s Day, but rather Dark Friday. The Koop+Kraft restaurant in Waterlooville, Hampshire, has a plan for just that. It’s promising that on Friday he’s giving away a free pint of petrol with every order, an offer perhaps more appetizing than a pizza-flavored gin. On a more practical note, restaurant chain Burger King does appear to be offering free Whoppers, blaming a “glitch” in its app, which issued a voucher to customers that must be redeemed by Saturday.

The curious mashed potato Easter egg from Mash Direct.
The curious mashed potato Easter egg from Mash Direct. Photography: Mash Direct

Still on the food front, Easter is traditionally a time when professional hand spinners walk around lamenting that Easter eggs no longer say Easter on them. They will no doubt be delighted that Mash Direct has most certainly called its new product an Easter egg. They may be less thrilled to find out it’s a chocolate egg stuffed with mashed potatoes.

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How the legend of Boggy Creek inspired the Blair Witch Project https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/how-the-legend-of-boggy-creek-inspired-the-blair-witch-project/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/how-the-legend-of-boggy-creek-inspired-the-blair-witch-project/ In 1999, people around the world were introduced to The Blair Witch Project, one of the most renowned found footage films ever made. Emulating amateur camerawork and focusing on a story steeped in urban legend, Daniel Myrick and Edward Sanchezmovie produced by Gregg Hale and Robin Cowie served as a gateway for many to horror […]]]>

In 1999, people around the world were introduced to The Blair Witch Project, one of the most renowned found footage films ever made. Emulating amateur camerawork and focusing on a story steeped in urban legend, Daniel Myrick and Edward Sanchezmovie produced by Gregg Hale and Robin Cowie served as a gateway for many to horror films attempting to parallel contemporary life. The characters in The Blair Witch Project are portrayed as student filmmakers, marching through the Black Hills of Maryland and experiencing psychological horrors at the hands of the mythological being they are pursuing. The presentation of the film gave it a realistic side, especially for the time. Three college students attempting to document an urban legend form a plot more than capable of suspending the disbelief of observers, no doubt attributed to Blair Witchis success. While the film is one of the most notable mockumentaries to date, it followed in the footsteps of the work of filmmakers who came before it.

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Many fans will return to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), which presented itself as the recreation of a true story. Films from the eventual slasher franchise, the film would occasionally create fictitious stock footage to further illustrate its claims. However, another incredibly remarkable film deserves consideration as a pioneer in mixing horror and pseudo-realism: 1972’s The Legend of Boggy Creek. The Labor of Love by the Filmmaker Charles B. Pierce (The city that dreaded sunset), marshy stream was shot as a real-world documentary and focused on a cryptozoological creature known as the “Fouke Monster”. What gave the film the credibility of a documentary? The roots of the Fouke Monster itself.

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picture of the legend of boggy creek
Image via Howco International Pictures

The small rural town of Fouke, Arkansas has received reports dating back decades of sightings of an upright ape-like creature stalking the vicinity of Boggy Creek. According to the Arkansas Encyclopedia, the creature even attacked a family in the early 1970s. In the years that followed, many Fouke businesses capitalized on rumors surrounding the creature and created a thriving tourist industry. around her. One of the most apparent is probably the Monster Mart in Fouke, a convenience store emblazoned with the Fouke Monster in its signage. The story of the monster has taken on a life of its own among Fouke residents as well as on the lips of tourists and passers-by.

Diving into the hype behind the cryptid creature, Charles B. Pierce literally got to work. In addition to producing and directing The Legend of Boggy Creek, Pierce also shot the film, interviewed individuals, and even sang the film’s theme song under a pseudonym. Billed as a documentary centered around the “true story” of the Fouke monster’s existence. Borrowing $160,000 from a local trucking company, Pierce filmed marshy stream with an antiquated camera, even by 1970s standards. But what exactly made this film the forerunner of mockumentaries and found footage? Simply put, the majority of actors chosen in marshy stream were residents of Fouke, many of whom had claimed to have had an encounter with the monster at one time or another.


In staged interviews, these Fouke folks recall their unsettling encounters with the monster, believed to be a hulking creature completely covered in hair, sporting three toes and staring from afar with glowing eyes. Some locals report that the monster moves at lightning speed, others claimed that it steals large animals for a snack. There are a lot of inconsistencies regarding how the creature works and behaves, but apparently everyone in the movie gives a very similar account of what it looks like. This kind of ambiguity and legend via word of mouth is the foundation of any good urban legend or cryptic story. Pierce knew that speculating on the unknown was a surefire way to sell the Boggy Creek Monster story.


image captionBoggy Creek
Image via Howco International Pictures

To lend more credence to the film, Pierce takes viewers along as he documents the efforts of the people of Fouke to kill the monster. Some claim to have come within six feet of the monster, shooting at it with their weapons, but the monster still somehow escapes. Potentially poor marksmanship aside, one of the film’s most memorable sequences follows another group of hunters searching for the monster. With hounds in tow, the hunters seem to be hunting down the monster. The hunters attempt to lose their hounds to the creature, but the hounds are apparently paralyzed with fear and refuse to pursue. Much of this action is accomplished without ever needing to show the monster itself, which, one might say, encourages viewers to find it in the background.


In the film’s final act, Pierce attempts to recreate the alleged attack the monster carried out on a local family. Stalking the family who are far from Fouke’s heart, the monster assaults the family after shooting them in self-defense. A family member is seriously injured and sent to hospital. This appearance of the monster pays for much of the setup and rumors claimed by the locals before the narrator states in the final scenes that the creature was never killed or captured.

That last remark has been a hallmark of scary stories long before the film was made. The murderous monster, the silent killer or the vengeful spirit is never stopped. He is still there somewhere, still waiting and watching. It’s one of the ideal story beats to wrap up any story based on real events, and it works just as effectively in marshy stream as it would for the films that followed afterwards. The cannibalistic Sawyer family still terrorizes travelers to Texas, Edward Carver (The Poughkeepsie Bands) continues to torture victims and evade capture in New York, and the Blair Witch continues to cause disappearances in the Black Hills. While a sadistic monster or serial killer is scary on its own, the idea that they could be anywhere is scary.



Image caption Boggy Creek Monster
Image via Howco International Pictures

The close parallels to reality paid big bucks for marshy stream when it hits theaters. Produced on a budget of $160,000 and shot largely with the help of a crew of local high school students, the film earned around $20 million, making it one of the highest-grossing films ever. profitability of 1972. In fact, marshy stream remains one of the highest-grossing independent films ever made relative to its budget. It was particularly well received at drive-ins at the time and opened the doors for several other drive-in movies that framed their narratives around “true stories” such as Walk with your head held high (1974), The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Jackson County Jail (1976), and even that of Pierce The city that dreaded sunset. Pierce’s DNA can be seen everywhere To sleepas the adaptation based on the 1946 Texarkana Moonlight Murders still maintains that Texarkana’s phantom murderer “still lurks in the streets”, as does the conclusion of marshy stream. Due to marshy streamcult of popularity, the film would also be remastered in 4k in 2019 thanks to the efforts of Pierce’s daughter Pamela Pierce Barcelou and the George Eastman Museum.

Corn The Blair Witch Project and The Legend of Boggy Creek have many differences, their commonalities still persist in the gap of several decades that separates them. Would like Blair Witchsuccess is assured even if marshy stream Never existed? It’s likely, but marshy streamStorytelling paved the way for the continued viability of one of the oldest storytelling conventions in human history: “The Other” is out there, he doesn’t value human life, and no one knows. when he could strike next.

If you ever find yourself in Fouke, Arkansas, stop by the Monster Shop and ask about the Fouke Monster. To this day, the townspeople carry on the legend. Reports of sightings of the monster keep coming in, and even more filmmakers have taken to Fouke in an attempt to document the monster in the wild. Just be careful if you head into Boggy Creek yourself, you never know what you might find.


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