Cryptozoology – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 02:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Cryptozoology – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ 32 32 In Bon and Lesley, Shaun Prescott wrote an Australian horror story of unique local proportions https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/in-bon-and-lesley-shaun-prescott-wrote-an-australian-horror-story-of-unique-local-proportions/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 02:19:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/in-bon-and-lesley-shaun-prescott-wrote-an-australian-horror-story-of-unique-local-proportions/ If ever a novel defined the territory its author would continue to roam, that’s exactly what Shaun Prescott’s debut novel, The Town (2018) did. It was like the indie boy band that smooths all your favorite punk acts into a unique mix. When I revisited The Town in these pages in 2019, I noted in […]]]>

If ever a novel defined the territory its author would continue to roam, that’s exactly what Shaun Prescott’s debut novel, The Town (2018) did. It was like the indie boy band that smooths all your favorite punk acts into a unique mix.

When I revisited The Town in these pages in 2019, I noted in particular how Prescott was able to synthesize elements from the late David Ireland and Gerald Murnane to create augmented Australian realism. Like Murnane and post-plot novelists such as Caesar Aira or Ottessa Moshfegh in My Year of Rest and Relaxation, Prescott wants the reader to focus on the poetics of variation within limited contexts, storylines, and language.

Why? In The Town, Prescott took this approach in order to sit with his creatively blocked and socially awkward narrator. It didn’t totally work; the idea could not bear the length of the novel. But in Prescott, Bon and Lesley’s latest, the mundane and repetitive nature of the novel’s voice and structure creates a more focused horror story of uniquely local proportions.


Review: Bon and Lesley – Shaun Prescott (Giramondo).


Readers of The Town will find stylistic coherences and familiar themes in Bon and Lesley.

The setting is a regional town and, as in the last novel, the town disappears in its path. There is, again, a slight class tension between an outsider and the “original” inhabitants of the town, and the related ethnographic curiosity or attraction that outsiders have for the town and its people. The narrative is similarly effectless, focusing on procedural action and noticing emotional states, without turning them into drama.

Finally, there is something that I consider truly Prescottian: the sexual ambivalence and even the asexuality of the intentions of his characters. In The Town, it was a depressive trait of the narrator, but in Bon and Lesley, the almost thoughtless rote expression of physical intimacy and the subconscious pull of gender role-playing become the troubling point of the story.

Together with Bon and Lesley, Prescott acts as a psychoanalyst in a lower-middle-class Australian colony of late capitalism. Some might imagine this to be a condescending subject for a “literary” author. But remember: most Australian writers are paid less than a blue-collar salary for their work, regardless of education or background. Most of us will at some point be dependent on Centrelink and hold several casual jobs; most of us will be supporting partners or children, while living in modest outlying or regional communities. Australian writers know the city, its history and its people.

This is important to note because where Bon and Lesley end up isn’t pretty. In the final section of the novel, Prescott’s view of his society becomes as wicked as possible without turning into a sour grimace. I’m not talking about graphic violence, but rampant psychological dysfunction, at a perfectly normalized level.

It’s the kind of thing that non-Indigenous Australian writing and media have excelled at representing for a century: a society that grapples with its own scabs, cuddles, flares and watches the ghosts of its mess come flooding in while she is drunk a soft sofa.



Read more: A look at A Million Windows by Gerald Murnane


Out of the novel, in the novel

Bon and Lesley’s setting is Newnes, which is located west of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales. Prescott transports us there with an epigraph from Eve Langley’s The Pea-Pickers, which is set in Gippsland but is the bestselling novel by an author who died alone in a hoarder’s hut in the Blue Mountains. (Remember what I said about Australian authors and economic marginalization?)

Outside of Romanesque, it is the eastern part of Wiradjuri Country. When descending the Dividing Range, it is a marginal zone where the altitude drops into the continental basin; it is the entrance to the massive Triassic Capertee Valley and Wollemi National Park with its remnant stands of Gondwana species. Outside of the novel, the Newnes area is famous in cryptozoology circles as the site of the only alleged record of Yowie vocalization. It is also a heritage mining site, a “frontier” hamlet on the tourist route.

Inside the novel, Newnes is a version of more populated neighboring towns: a semi-industrial regional center with a square, car parks and chicken coop, and an abandoned blast furnace resembling that of nearby Lithgow. Inside the novel, the colonial apocalypse is happening again – only this time it happens to the colonists.

The slip reflects how Prescott seals his characters and readers into the void that is Newnes. Bon and Lesley are the strangers, the commuters who stop by train from town and never leave. Their paralysis is not only psychological; it is discovered midway through the novel that rail service has in fact ceased since their arrival.

It is reminiscent of the experience of millennial modernism in Australia, in which suburban expansion is paradoxically defined by services withdrawn from the regions. It also alludes to the Australian gothic trope we find in the novel and film Wake in Fright, in which the stranger can enter but not leave the town and a sense of the clock quickly melts upon arrival.



Read more: ‘It’s not us’. Wake in Fright at 50, a portrait of an ugly Australia that has become a cinema classic


From there, Prescott can only decenter the off-centers. Bon and Lesley are cared for by Steven and his supposed brother, Jack. They quickly establish a coercive relationship based on circumstance and co-dependency, rather than shared values ​​or kinship ties.

One section each is focused through Bon and Lesley, followed by a third chapter, told omnisciently. We don’t really learn much about Bon or Lesley through this structure. On the contrary, they offer very free and very indirect impressions of the debates.

The found family’s routine consists of meals sourced from the food court or, as the pickings get thin, from the gas station. Rum is consumed from morning to evening. The creation of domestic occupations and small dramas around habit and propriety becomes important, reproducing the routines of a bourgeois family.

Bon and Lesley yearn to escape to the small mining town of Sofala, location of Peter Weir’s auto-horror film The Cars that Ate Paris (1974). Their dream is unshakeable despite the constant bushfires and yard fires that lick their neighborhood. In what must be the most eerie portrayal yet of the recent fire trauma in eastern Australia, long drives to stores continue through hazy air and blackened skies. The pedantically planned getaway to Sofala is cut short because the road is on fire.

Shaun Prescott.
Giramondo Editions


Read more: Gender-ambiguous author Eve Langley is ripe for rediscovery. A new biography sheds light on his difficult life


Despicable devolutions

This dysfunctional ecology and culture is the breeding ground for what happens within the miniature society of the family. From the moment Bon and Lesley meet Steven and Jack, they are aware of the Colossal Man’s presence. The void at the center of the novel, Colossal Man is a veritable presence of horror: a faceless, voiceless mass of flesh cruising aimlessly down the sidewalk (I imagined the Baron of Dune, or perhaps Les Murray stuffed in a sedan).

Colossal Man lives in an Eve Langley-like bush hut with an underground lair. He writes fascist literature and has an indescribable hard drive. Jack is his incel apprentice.

Prescott chooses never to depict the contents of Jack and Colossal Man’s DIY computer screens or publications, though we know Lesley recoils from them. In a sense, it’s a classic horror technique, allowing readers to imagine their own worst fears.

On the other hand, Prescott refuses to reinscribe violence. It’s not the kind he wants us to worry about. Once face to face with Colossal Man through Lesley, one realizes that the impact of his material is meaningless compared to the ordinary decay of the city. Colossal Man, the monstrous child of the novel, is only a symptom.

The devolution of characters over the course of the novel is simply abject. The horizons of the four protagonists are reduced to their safe and flat roles.

When sexual contact does occur, it is stealthy rubbing and awkward hugging from or by Lesley. She develops a routine of drinking wine from the barrel, preparing snack trays, going to bed regularly, and giving praise to Steven and Jack as they relax watching Star Wars. At first a courageous leader of the family’s destiny, and a sacred action heroine in her own way, Lesley comes to relish her role as mother to “the boys” (another allusion: to the threatening film by Stephen Sewell and Rowan Wood of the same name). When Lesley stops longing to escape, Bon is free to let go of his reluctant fatherhood and give up.

For a time, Steven clings to a “stay in your lane” class dream, in which “freedom is having a job and not being beaten”. This provides him with a coherent, albeit narrow, philosophy of life. He begins as the designer of the family band, but the purpose of his days dissolves into maintaining the household’s liquor supply and being paid cash to needlessly burn down abandoned houses. The job shuts down (literally) and his fear of being attacked becomes a reality when an unseen force begins to threaten the family home.

When we first meet Jack, he finds meaning as an online keyboard warrior and creates brown noise tracks in his bedroom. He is secretive and defensive about his digital life and is under the influence of Colossal Man. This intimacy gives him a sense of identity. Lesley’s probative influence encourages Jack to distance himself from Colossal Man’s hateful material. But Jack decides that removing his creative voice from the world is the ultimate form of independence:

Powers that we don’t understand or even know about, try to control us through music and movies and all that is called art […] But my sound – and he said my sound in a tone bordering on hubris – will survive it all to never be heard.

If Jack’s art theory is correct, then Prescott uses Bon and Lesley to immunize us against the infantilizing, apathetic creep of cultural homogeneity and insularity. This is most definitely a Morrison-era novel. And perhaps that highlights another layer of his intent: to persuade us that in the dysfunctionality of relaxed and comfortable colonialism, the old genres of apocalyptic and gothic horror still have value.

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Why do AIs keep creating nightmarish images of strange characters? https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-do-ais-keep-creating-nightmarish-images-of-strange-characters/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 12:43:14 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-do-ais-keep-creating-nightmarish-images-of-strange-characters/ By Matthew Sparkes Loab, a character consistently produced by an AI image generator Supercomposite/Twitter Some artificial intelligences can generate realistic images from a simple text prompt. These tools have been used to illustrate magazine covers and win art contests, but they can also create very strange results. Nightmarish images of strange creatures keep popping up, […]]]>

Loab, a character consistently produced by an AI image generator

Supercomposite/Twitter

Some artificial intelligences can generate realistic images from a simple text prompt. These tools have been used to illustrate magazine covers and win art contests, but they can also create very strange results. Nightmarish images of strange creatures keep popping up, sometimes called digital cryptids, named after animals that cryptozoologists, but not mainstream scientists, believe may exist somewhere. The phenomenon has made national headlines and sparked rumors on social media, so what’s going on?

What images are generated?

A Twitter user asked an AI model called DALL-E mini, renamed from Craiyon, to generate images of the word “crungus”. They were surprised by the consistent theme exits: image after image of a surly, hairy, goat-like man.

Then come the pictures of Loab, a woman with black hair, red cheeks, and missing or disfigured eyes. In a series of artist-generated images, Loab evolves and emerges in ever more disturbing scenarios, yet remains recognizable.

Are these characters discovered, invented or copied?

Some people on social media have jokingly suggested that the AI ​​is simply revealing the existence of Crungus and Loab, and the consistency of the images is proof that they are real beings.

Mhairi Aitken of the Alan Turing Institute in London says nothing could be further from the truth. “Rather than something scary, what this actually shows are some of the limitations of AI image generator models,” she says. “Scary demon theories will likely continue to spread via social media and fuel the public imagination about the future of AI, while the real explanations might be a little duller.”

The origins of these images lie in the vast amounts of text, photographs and other human-created data, which are retrieved by AI-in-training, Aitken says.

Where does Crungus come from?

Comedian Guy Kelly, who generated the original Crungus footage, told new scientist that he was just trying to come up with made-up words that the AI ​​could somehow construct a clear picture of.

“I’d seen people try existing things in the bot — ‘three dogs riding a seagull,’ etc. — but I didn’t recall seeing anyone using plausible-sounding gibberish,” he says. “I thought it would be fun to plug a nonsense word into the AI ​​bot to see if something that looked like a concrete thing in my head gave consistent results. I had no idea what a C was.rungus would look like, just that it sounded a bit ‘goblinny’.

While AI influences in the creation of Crungus number in the hundreds or thousands, there are a few things we can point to as likely culprits. There are a range of games that involve a character named Crungus and mentions of the word on Urban Dictionary from 2018 are of a monster that does “gross” things. The word is also no different from Krampus – a creature believed to punish naughty children at Christmas in some parts of Europe – and the appearance of the two creatures is also similar.

Mark Lee of the University of Birmingham, UK, says Crungus is just a composite of data Craiyon has seen. “I think you could say he produces original stuff,” he says. “But they are based on previous examples. It may just be a mixed image from multiple sources. And it looks very scary, right? »

Where is Loab from?

Loab is a slightly different, but equally fictional beast. The artist Supercompositewho generated Loab and asked to remain anonymous, said new scientist that Loab was the result of time spent sifting through the outputs of an unnamed AI for original results.

“That says a lot about the accidents that happen inside these neural networks, which are kind of black boxes,” they say. “It’s all based on the images that people have created and how people have decided to collect and maintain the training data set. So while it may seem like a ghost in the machine, it doesn’t only reflects our collective cultural production.

Loab was created with a “negatively weighted prompt”, which, unlike a normal prompt, is an instruction to the AI ​​to create an image conceptually as far away from the input as possible. The outcome of these negative entries can be unpredictable.

Supercomposite asked the AI ​​to create the opposite of “Brando”, which resulted in a logo with the text “DIGITA PNTICS”. They then requested the opposite of that and received a series of images from Loab.

“Text prompts generally lead to a very broad set of outputs and greater flexibility,” says Aitken. “It may be that when a negative prompt is used, the resulting images are more constrained. So one theory is that negative prompts might be more likely to repeat certain images or aspects of them, and that may explain why Loab seems so persistent.

What does this say about public understanding of AI?

Although we rely on AIs daily for everything from unlocking our phones with our face to talking with a voice assistant like Alexa or even protecting our bank accounts from fraud, even the researchers who develop them don’t quite understand how. AIs work. This is because AIs learn to do things without us knowing how they do them. We just see an entrance and an exit, the rest is hidden. This can lead to misunderstandings, says Aitken.

“AI is discussed as if it’s somehow magical or mysterious,” she says. “This is probably the first of many examples that could well give rise to conspiracy theories or myths about characters living in cyberspace. It’s really important that we correct these misunderstandings and misconceptions about AI so that people understand that these are just computer programs, which only do what they are programmed to do, and that what they produce is the result of human ingenuity and imagination.

“What’s scary, I think, is really that these urban legends were born,” says Lee. “And then kids and other people take these things seriously. As scientists, we have to be very careful to say, “Look, that’s all that’s really going on, and it’s not supernatural.”

Learn more about these topics:

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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with the San Antonio Public Library – The City of San Antonio https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-with-the-san-antonio-public-library-the-city-of-san-antonio/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 20:29:15 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-with-the-san-antonio-public-library-the-city-of-san-antonio/ CONTACT: Victoria Villarreal victoria.villarreal2@sanantonio.gov SAN ANTONIO (September 9, 2022) – San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with a series of unique events to honor the culture, history, and contributions of Hispanic and Latino communities. Hispanic Heritage Month takes place from September 15 to October 15 each year, and SAPL programs celebrating the […]]]>

CONTACT: Victoria Villarreal
victoria.villarreal2@sanantonio.gov

SAN ANTONIO (September 9, 2022) – San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with a series of unique events to honor the culture, history, and contributions of Hispanic and Latino communities. Hispanic Heritage Month takes place from September 15 to October 15 each year, and SAPL programs celebrating the celebration begin on Monday, September 12. Programs will include film screenings, cooking classes, author events, and more. The selection of programs, events, activities, books and other items aim to encourage San Antonians not only to celebrate these rich and diverse cultures for one month of the year, but to recognize and connect with the deep roots of Hispanic and Latin American culture within our city all year round. For a complete list of Hispanic Heritage Month events at SAPL, visit guides.mysapl.org/hhm.


For more information on library services, visit https://www.mysapl.org. Library staff are available by phone at 210-207-2500 or by chat at ask.mysapl.org.



Hispanic Heritage Month at SAPL



Teen Time @ Johnston: cooking around the world
Johnston Library – 6307 Sun Valley, 78227
Monday, September 12, 5-6 p.m.
This cooking and culture class program with recipes from around the world is a hands-on cooking experience for teens. Teens only from 13 to 18 years old.



Monday night lights, camera, action!
Las Palmas Library – 515 Castroville Road, 78237
Monday, September 12, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Join us for a movie night at the Las Palmas Library! We will screen: “Stand and Deliver” [PG]the story of Jamie Escalante, a math teacher at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, who pushes and inspires 18 inner-city Hispanic students who struggled with math to become math pros.



Miraflores: The Legacy of Dr. Aureliano Urrutia with Anne Elise Urrutia
Central Library – 600 Soledad Street, 78205
Saturday September 17, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Dr. Aureliano Urrutia, a prominent physician from Mexico City, immigrated to San Antonio in 1914 during the Mexican Revolution. He built his atmospheric garden, called Miraflores, near the headwaters of the San Antonio River, to reflect his love and memory for his homeland. In “Miraflores”, Anne Elise Urrutia, Urrutia’s great-granddaughter, reveals the history of the garden by drawing on family archives and other
primary sources to reveal this remarkable story.



Author’s conference for children “accordion”
Potranco Library – 8765 State Hwy. 151, #102, 78245 and online*
Saturday September 17, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Join us for a virtual appearance by children’s author Michael Genhart, author of “Accordion: Abuelo and Opa Make Music”. In addition to enjoying the author’s virtual presentation, in-person attendees will also have the opportunity to witness an accordion performance by Nicolas Valdez, receive a Take-and-Make accordion craft, and participate to a mural creation with San Antonio visual artist Colton Valentine. , voted Best Visual Artist in San Antonio Current. Online participants will be able to listen to the author speak and visit their local branch to pick up the Take-and-Make accordion.


*(Registration required for online participation. Register here)



Xavier Garza: “The Great and Powerful Nikko”
Bazan Library – 2200 W. Commerce St., 78207
Sunday, September 18, 2-3 p.m.
Award-winning children’s author Xavier Garza will read excerpts from his book ‘The Great and Mighty Nikko’. Children will have the opportunity to make their own luchador mask after the reading.


Crafts for adults: Alebrijes

Great Northwest Library – 9050 Wellwood, 78250
Monday, September 19, 5 p.m.
A twist on classic Mexican folk art. We will be using aluminum foil and masking tape to create these colorful fantasy sculptures.



Monday night lights, camera, action!
Las Palmas Library – 515 Castroville Road, 78237
Monday, September 26, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Join us for a movie night at the Las Palmas Library!
We will be screening: Selena [PG]the story of the Grammy Award-winning singer whose life tragically ended as she pursued her dreams.



Raza Cosmica
Central Library – 600 Soledad Street, 78205
Saturday October 1, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Activist/Musician Joaquín Muerte will host a live episode of his original podcast, “Xicanx Versus Aliens”, an exploration of “all things UFO, cryptozoology, the paranormal, the occult and more from the perspective of ‘a person of color’. Actors Jesse Borrego and Désirée K. Segura join Muerte to discuss Latinx sci-fi cinema. Followed by a curated selection of cosmic-infused shorts.



“Hyper-Reality”
Keiichi Matsuda, 2016, Colombia, 6 min
Hyper-Reality presents a provocative, kaleidoscopic new vision of the future, where physical and virtual realities have merged, and Medellín is saturated with media.



“In Search of Aliens”
Susan Aparicio, 2021, USA, 13 mins
In Search of Aliens is a time-spanning collaboration between daughter and father to find connection within and between the greater universe.



“Yoshi”
Matthew Castellanos, 2017, USA 20 min
A group of outcast teens must flee their hometown of South Central, Los Angeles in
in order to protect their blue alien friend from a ban on his kind.



“Luminous”
Than Niles, 2020, USA, 11 mins
In Luminous, a restless security guard, Lou, is forced to choose between his job at the
research center and the fate of mankind when confronted by the mysterious Dr.
Sharp and the truth about what he keeps.



“New Rico”
Kristian Mercado, 2021, USA/Puerto Rico, 16 min
A brother and sister stumble upon a heavenly secret that changes their lives forever and
propelled them to Reggaetón stardom, but they soon discovered that their newfound fame
comes at a high price.


Bexar County Spanish Archives and Genealogical Research

Central Library – 600 Soledad Street, 78205
Saturday October 8, 2-3 p.m.
David Carlson will provide an overview of the Bexar County Spanish Archives, which, in addition to serving as a repository of Spanish-language records of ancient Bexar County history, also provide family history research assistance. For novice genealogists or more experienced researchers facing a “brick wall,” a visit to the Spanish Archives might offer a guide to where to go next.

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Dark Nights Behind the Haunt: Creature Chaos https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/dark-nights-behind-the-haunt-creature-chaos/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/dark-nights-behind-the-haunt-creature-chaos/ Unique link with Hershey and Central PA Pennsylvania, also known as Penn’s Woods, has roots that date back to the arrival of the British in the 17th century. With all the history and thousands of square miles of dark, ominous forests, it’s no surprise that the myths, legends, and folklore surrounding the creatures that lurk […]]]>

Unique link with Hershey and Central PA

Pennsylvania, also known as Penn’s Woods, has roots that date back to the arrival of the British in the 17th century. With all the history and thousands of square miles of dark, ominous forests, it’s no surprise that the myths, legends, and folklore surrounding the creatures that lurk in these same woods are prevalent in every county. When our design team arrived from Pasadena, California, they had already researched a cryptozoological scenario. However, a nighttime visit to our historic amphitheater crystallized the idea of ​​a mythical traveling menagerie hosted by a Pennsylvania forest impresario.

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Cloud Workers, speculative biology and Navajo archives https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/cloud-workers-speculative-biology-and-navajo-archives/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:15:37 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/cloud-workers-speculative-biology-and-navajo-archives/ Who manages the Cloud? (infinite time)by Steven González MonserrateTo be online is to be immaterial. But the Internet relies on a physical foundation of hot, bulky servers. In many cases, the workers who maintain them rely on their physical senses, masculine bravado, and deep dedication to their craft. The marvel of speculative biology (Vary)by John […]]]>

Who manages the Cloud? (infinite time)
by Steven González Monserrate
To be online is to be immaterial. But the Internet relies on a physical foundation of hot, bulky servers. In many cases, the workers who maintain them rely on their physical senses, masculine bravado, and deep dedication to their craft.

The marvel of speculative biology (Vary)
by John Paul Brammer
From cryptozoology to stories about humanity’s transformation into something new over millions of years, speculative biology uses art and science to reimagine life. For some, it can be a balm for existential fear.

Meet a corporate psychedelic scientist (Wired)
by John Semley
Companies and venture capitalists are investing in the development of new psychedelic drugs. For some enthusiasts, it’s almost a sacrilege. But for some chemists, it’s the opportunity of a lifetime.

What do Navajo digital resources look like? (Public books)
by Rachel May
A college librarian back in the Navajo Nation explores collaborations in language learning resources, recovering films made by colonizers, and revamping cataloging systems.

Extend the trials of asylum seekers (The conversation)
by Tazreena Sajjad
Under international law, nations have an obligation to provide refuge to asylum seekers. Instead, some rich countries are now paying poorer ones to take in these desperate people, who may then face new dangers and human rights abuses.

Do you have a tip on a well-documented story that belongs on this list? Email us here.

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Champ Day will feature cryptozoology experts | New https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/champ-day-will-feature-cryptozoology-experts-new/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/champ-day-will-feature-cryptozoology-experts-new/ PORT HENRY – This year’s Champ Day celebration in Port Henry will feature several cryptozoology experts talking about the legendary lake monster. Among them will be Paul Bartholomew of Whitehall, a researcher investigating unexplained phenomena that include Champ, Bigfoot, ghosts, hauntings, aerial anomalies and parapsychology. MEETING WITH CRYPTOCAVE “Paul does it all,” Champions Day chair […]]]>

PORT HENRY – This year’s Champ Day celebration in Port Henry will feature several cryptozoology experts talking about the legendary lake monster.

Among them will be Paul Bartholomew of Whitehall, a researcher investigating unexplained phenomena that include Champ, Bigfoot, ghosts, hauntings, aerial anomalies and parapsychology.

MEETING WITH CRYPTOCAVE

“Paul does it all,” Champions Day chair Andrea Anesi said via email. “We have some pretty great programming this year for the CryptoCave meet and greet. My personal and sincere thanks to each of our guests for their participation in Champions Day. They are all awesome.

“Champ Day: The Lake Champlain Monster Festival” is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, August 6 at Champ Beach Park on Beach Road in Port Henry, sponsored by the Moriah Chamber of Commerce.

“LUCY AND THE LAKE MONSTER”

Other cryptozoologists at Champ Day include Shetan Noir, a Michigan-based author and owner of Squatch GQ Magazine; and Karac St. Laurent, researcher and documentary filmmaker for Crash-Course Cryptozoology.

Other celebrities at the event will be Richard Rossi, producer and director of ‘Lucy and the Lake Monster’, as well as Lucy author Kelly Tabor and star of the film Emma Pearson.

Anesi said they will all be in the Big Green CryptoCave tent during the festivities.

There is also a Champ Lure Contest at 1 p.m.

“How would you lure Champ for a photo?” Anesi said. “Create or practice your lure, register at the Moriah Chamber of Commerce booth and present it to the contest at 1pm on Champions Day. You could win a $50 cash prize and the admiration of your fellow Champ fans.

The other parts of Champ Day are the cardboard boat race. Participants build a boat starting at 10 a.m., supplies provided, and racing at noon, sponsored by Red Brick Cafe and Village Inn in Port Henry.

CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES

Penelope the Clown – AKA Cathy Sprague – entertains all day, sponsored by TrailNorth Federal Credit Union.

The Creative Cove for Kids is all day in the Big Blue Tent. Kids can color their own official Team Champ travel mug to take home. There are two designs to choose from, created by Cody Lang of North Road Soap Co. and Kyle Miller of Home of Champ.

The day before the event, Legendary Monster Movies take place at Bulwagga Bay Beach on Bulwagga Drive in Port Henry, adjacent to the town campground.

On Friday, August 5 at 7 p.m., Plattsburgh film collector Andy MacDougall will present the 1954 film “Monster from the Ocean Floor.”

As a movie night contest, if viewers wear their best and wackiest themed outfits, like beach/tiki, 50s retro or monster/creature, they could win a monstrously fun prize, said Anesi.

A Champ Day shuttle will run to and from downtown Port Henry and the State Boat Launch/Powerhouse Park parking lot to the event. Pick-up and drop-off locations are in front of Stewart’s stores on Main Street in Port Henry and at the boat launch.

Downtown merchants are holding promotions and sales for Champions Day, Anesi said, in honor of the mysterious creature first seen hundreds of years ago on Lake Champlain.

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Bangor International Museum of Cryptozoology offers oddities and curiosities https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/bangor-international-museum-of-cryptozoology-offers-oddities-and-curiosities/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 23:04:12 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/bangor-international-museum-of-cryptozoology-offers-oddities-and-curiosities/ BANGOUR — The International Cryptozoology Museum in Bto worry is only a few months old, but is already making a name for itself. The museum is the second place opened by the famous cryptozoologist LGolden VSOlman, affectionately known as the “Godfather of cryptozoology.” Cryptozoology is the study and research of unknown, legendary or hidden animals. […]]]>

BANGOUR — The International Cryptozoology Museum in Bto worry is only a few months old, but is already making a name for itself.

The museum is the second place opened by the famous cryptozoologist LGolden VSOlman, affectionately known as the “Godfather of cryptozoology.”

Cryptozoology is the study and research of unknown, legendary or hidden animals.

“He thought it would be nice to bring a bit of the museum here because a lot of people can’t travel to Portland to see that one,” said Jean Tewksbury, curator of operations at the International Museum of Cryptozoology. “And then we were able to add some of the Etienne King stuff that goes with the bangor cultural,” she said.

Tewksbury said the museum offers a wide range of wonders, including his personal favourite, the legendary Bigfoot.

“When I was 7, I saw the documentary they made, ‘Sasquatch: The Legend of Bigfoot.“He had the Patterson-gimlin pictures in it, and I’ve been hooked ever since,” Tewksbury said.

Tewksbury says there are several fun events on the horizon, including a conference at Portland which is scheduled for next spring.

She said the bangor and Portland Museums are universal, which sets them apart from similar attractions around the world.

“There are a ton of different Bigfoot museums throughout the country, there is a Mthe other west v museumirginia and… there is a Icelandic sea ​​serpent museum Iceland as well. So it all kind of has its own little thing, but it brings them all together,” she said.

The bangor the location is located at 585 Hammond St, offers free admission and is open Friday by Ssunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For more information on the quirks of the International Cryptozoology Museum, visit cryptozoology museum.com.

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Lake Norman sea creature gets a name on new county park trail https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/lake-norman-sea-creature-gets-a-name-on-new-county-park-trail/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:16:18 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/lake-norman-sea-creature-gets-a-name-on-new-county-park-trail/ Catawba County has officially named one of the most visible trails in its new 606-acre Mountain Creek Park after a legendary Lake Norman sea creature that anglers and homeowners still report seeing roaming the waters. The park opens Saturday on the northwest tip of the lake in Sherrills Ford, about 35 miles north of Charlotte. […]]]>

Catawba County has officially named one of the most visible trails in its new 606-acre Mountain Creek Park after a legendary Lake Norman sea creature that anglers and homeowners still report seeing roaming the waters.

The park opens Saturday on the northwest tip of the lake in Sherrills Ford, about 35 miles north of Charlotte. Among its 19.52 miles of total trails is a 0.82 mile paved, ADA-accessible “easy” trail named Stormie Normie that winds 90 to 100 feet to a pier on the lake.

Stormie Normie is a child-friendly name for the legendary Loch Norman monster, park officials told The Charlotte Observer during a preview tour.

Sightings of a giant fish have been reported on the lake for decades, according to news outlets and a website dedicated to the legend.

With 520 miles of shoreline, Lake Norman spans parts of Mecklenburg, Iredell, Lincoln, and Catawba counties.

Park staff have been considering the names of the mountain bike trails, Catawba County spokeswoman Amy McCauley told the Observer this week.

The names “were inspired by the history, traditions and habitat associated with the location of Mountain Creek Park,” McCauley said in an email. “Because it’s a park, the names have also been infused with a bit of fun.”

fishing rodeo 07.JPG
Some think the legendary Lake Norman sea monster is just a gigantic catfish. Tim Isbell (Biloxi, Mississippi) Sun Herald file photo

‘What the fuck is this thing?’

Public interest in spotting the beast prompted cruises where passengers searched Lake Norman with binoculars.

In 2017, a film crew from the Japanese TV show “What’s This – Mysteries From Around the World” embarked on an unsuccessful three-day hunting expedition to find the beast, the Observer reported era.

Anglers and owners, however, continue to report sightings on LakeNormanMonster.com, a site that sells Normie t-shirts, mugs, beach blankets, posters, prints and a children’s book.

A crappie fisherman reported the last encounter on January 18.

“Could it have been Normie?” the Sherrills Ford man posted to the website after he said he saw ‘something sticking out of the water’ while fishing from a pier in Mountain Creek, at the northwest end of the lake in the Catawba County.

“But it was moving,” he said. “The head would go forward, then it would slow to a stop and go back. I was like, ‘what the hell is this freaking thing?!'”

The creature was brown and “about as big as a goose’s body, but it wasn’t a goose!” reports the fisherman. “It moved about 20ft then slowly descended. I was blown away by anything…and I’m not mad!!

His phone died the moment he tried to photograph the creature, he said.

“I saw it there too!” one person answered.

“I caught ginormous catfish. I was a fan of the idea of ​​something being mutated and genetically crossed into a different species,” another person replied.

“What did I just see? A monster?’

On July 31, 2021, while paddle boarding in Person’s Cove, an unnamed Denver, NC resident saw “a dark figure 6-8 feet just below the surface, about 10 feet from the shore”.

“A few parts were barely above water, then all of a sudden they splashed and went underwater,” the owner told LakeNormanMonster.com.

Five minutes later, “the same creature broke through the surface of the nearby water,” according to the report.

“What’s going on?” the person wondered. “What did I just see? A monster?”

“Dinosaur-Like Creature”

In July 2017, a 35-year-old man from Mecklenburg County told CryptoZoology.com that he spotted a “dinosaur-like creature” while traveling on a boat with friends, the Observer reported at the time.

The man described the creature as “splashing through water”, 10ft long and reminiscent of the mythical Loch Ness monster. It was visible for about a minute before sinking below the surface, he told the website.

Longnose Gar
The long-nosed gar bears a bite of nasty-looking teeth. The fish, which can grow to 5 or 6 feet long, roam Lake Norman, including near the new fishing pier in Mountain Creek Park, park rangers in Catawba County, North Carolina said. Michael Pearce File photo of the Wichita eagle (Kan.)

It’s just a gigantic fish, say skeptics

Skeptics say the monster is just an ordinary fish grown up.

The creature is likely a catfish that grew over 8 feet long, a Clemmons diver posted to LakeNormanMonster.com in 2017.

In response to a Denver, North Carolina resident’s post on the website, another person said the owner had probably seen a giant catfish, an alligator gar that can grow up to 10 feet long, or a long-nosed gar.

The longnose gar, which can reach 5 or 6 feet in length, definitely roams the lake, including near the new fishing pier in Mountain Creek Park, park officials told the Observer.

This story was originally published June 18, 2022 7 a.m.

Charlotte Observer Related Stories

Joe Marusak has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer since 1989, covering locals, towns and major news events in the area, and served as editor of the newspaper’s press office. He is currently reporting on the latest news.

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You Don’t Want To Miss These 8 Miniature Museums Across The United States https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/you-dont-want-to-miss-these-8-miniature-museums-across-the-united-states/ Thu, 26 May 2022 12:56:15 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/you-dont-want-to-miss-these-8-miniature-museums-across-the-united-states/ It only takes a road trip across the United States to realize how big this country can seem – in terms of physical space and diversity of ideas – and how small at the same time. Of course, scale is relative, but still there are some places so big or so small that they blur […]]]>

It only takes a road trip across the United States to realize how big this country can seem – in terms of physical space and diversity of ideas – and how small at the same time. Of course, scale is relative, but still there are some places so big or so small that they blur our sense of perception. If you cram every person on earth, they’d only fill a fraction of the Grand Canyon, as all 895,000 pre-1992 buildings across New York’s five boroughs are housed inside the Queens Museum of Art, a miniature metropolis built to a scale of 1:1200. In the middle of Kansas, a state known for its wide and flat vistas, you’ll find several great things besides a museum that straddles both ends of the size spectrum: The world’s largest collection of the world’s smallest versions of the largest big things.

Related
The artist behind a museum of miniature versions of ‘the world’s largest’ objects

While vast, sprawling collections of important art and artifacts like the Met or Smithsonian museums are essential stops on any road trip, here are 8 miniature museums that prove that sometimes it’s quality – not square footage. in square feet – of the exposure that matters.


1. The smallest museum in the world

Measuring just over 100 square feet, the world’s smallest museum displays ‘artifacts of ordinary life’, including a 1984 Compaq computer, a Beatles concert poster, a letter from John F. Kennedy, natural curiosities and the “largest jar of prehistoric artifacts in the world”. Puzzle Pieces.” Located in a small red shed behind the Buckboard City Cafe an hour east of Phoenix, Arizona, the world’s smallest museum is free, but donations are appreciated.


a small light green photo processing booth with a sign saying
The famous crochet museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan
dozens of crochet animals and figures sit on shelves
The famous crochet museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

2. World famous Crochet Museum

The World Famous Crochet Museum, owned by artist Shari Elf, is housed in a tiny former photo processing booth just outside Joshua Tree National Park. Elf has been collecting crochet items since the early 90s; after buying the photo booth, she built shelves to display her collection, painted it bright green, and moved it to Southern California. Elf is a curator, not a designer (she claims she can’t crochet), whose collection includes poodles, dolls, flowers, cats, waffles, a split banana, a full nativity scene, and even a (small) kitchen sink. The museum’s official curator is not Elf, but a crocheted alligator named Bunny, who reminds potential visitors that the free museum “is always open, even if we’re not there.”


a stuffed raccoon is dressed as dorothy from the wizard of oz on display in a store
Taxidermy at Eyegore. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

3. Eyegore Odditorium and Monster Museum

Eyegore’s Odditorium and Monster Museum is a new addition to Cawker City, Kansas, home to the world’s largest ball of string. Located directly across from the small town’s famous big attraction, Eyegore’s is part shop, part museum, and the home of Matt “Wizard of Odd” Alford and his wife, “Master of Monster Management”, Julie. The space is only officially open on weekends for now, but visitors are encouraged to call the couple; If they’re at home, they’ll probably be happy to show off their collection, which includes custom taxidermy pieces, ancient medical equipment, a full human skeleton and what they believe to be Kansas’ biggest pants.


a shrunken head on display in a museum
A shrunken head in the Gunnison collection. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan
an ornate three-story gray stone building with a green rotunda and a clock on top
The Akin Free Library. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

4. The Olive Gunnison Collection

The crown jewel of Akin’s Free Library’s eclectic archives is easy to miss – you’ll have to descend into the building’s basement to see Olive M. Gunnison’s curious collection. Gunnison began collecting insects, mice and worms as a child, then moved on to preserving her own specimens. The mother and housewife kept her burgeoning collection in a shed behind her house, dubbed a ‘chamber of horrors’ by her husband, until it was donated to the library in Pawling, New York, in 1960. Currently, Gunnison’s collection occupies four rooms, divided into two sections: one devoted to natural history and a cabinet of curiosities. The museum includes dozens of taxidermy specimens, a shrunken head from Ecuador, the footprints of a dinosaur captured in stone, uranium ore and a mammoth tooth.

Related
A collection of world-class curiosities slowly evaporates in a dusty basement


a city street with open doors leading to a museum in an old elevator
The Mmuseum. | Photo: Wikimedia Commons

5. Mmuseumm

First opened in 2012 in a downtown Manhattan elevator shaft, the 36-square-foot Mmuseumm is currently located in Cortlandt Alley, just south of Canal Street. Dedicated to “object journalism”, the Mmuseumm website presents it as “a new type of museum, growing in a network of expected and unexpected places, dedicated to the exploration of modern humanity and current events. through the revelation of objects from around the world”. Old items on display included a first-generation iPod, artwork created by prisoners, and a broken lava lamp. The Mmuseumm is temporarily closed but the collection is visible 24/7 through an observation window.


a row of bonsai is displayed outside
National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

6. National Bonsai and Penjing Museum

Located less than 3 miles east of the US Capitol and the National Mall, and nestled in the middle of the 446-acre US National Arboretum, is a small museum of small trees with a long history: the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. The mission of the free outdoor museum is to educate future generations about the ancient art of bonsai. Featuring over 100 specimens, the collection is divided by region of origin and includes trees from Japan, China and North America, many of which are centuries old.

Related
The National Bonsai Museum may be tiny, but it represents centuries of history


a bigfoot statue stands under a sign for the cryptozoology and paranormal museum
Museum of Cryptozoology and the Paranormal. | Photo: Alexandra Charitan

7. Cryptozoology and Paranormal Museum

After he and his family moved from Long Island to Littleton, North Carolina, former New York journalist Stephen Barcelo began to suspect that their historic home was haunted. Today, the ground floor of their house houses the Museum of Cryptozoology and the Paranormal. One room is dedicated to the paranormal, including several haunted dolls, tombstone carvings, an old wooden coffin, and shrunken heads; the other is dedicated to cryptids, with plaster casts of Bigfoot footprints and other evidence of the mythical creatures’ existence. One of the most popular items sold by Barcelo is a complete Bigfoot go-bag for those doing their own research; Barcelo and his daughter Holly also run ghost tours and conduct paranormal investigations around the country.

Related
This former New York journalist turned his haunted house into a museum


a sign hanging from a brick building reads
The Pocket Museum has no address. | Photo: Caroline Eubanks

8. Hattiesburg Pocket Museum

When Mississippi’s Hattiesburg Pocket Museum opened in August 2020, the museum had no address or phone number. Today, a search will take you to an adjacent street, but visitors still have to find the right alley themselves, and that’s part of the fun. On busy weekends, you might be able to follow the crowds or ask someone to show you the way, like at a speakeasy. The museum itself, consisting of a window with shelves, is just part of the Pocket Museum experience, which includes several large-scale murals, a theater made from a modified ViewMaster, and a art gallery created in a former newsstand. Visitors can scan QR codes to get more information about exhibits and submit their own pieces for the exhibition.


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Mothman Prophecies – The cosmic horror movie is still thrilling 20 years later https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/mothman-prophecies-the-cosmic-horror-movie-is-still-thrilling-20-years-later/ Mon, 16 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/mothman-prophecies-the-cosmic-horror-movie-is-still-thrilling-20-years-later/ Babysitting is arguably the most dangerous after-school job in the world of young adult horror. The caregivers in these books consider themselves lucky if the biggest problem of the night is getting the kids to bed. These less fortunate assistants have to deal with a variety of boogeymen. While not every waking second in these […]]]>

Babysitting is arguably the most dangerous after-school job in the world of young adult horror. The caregivers in these books consider themselves lucky if the biggest problem of the night is getting the kids to bed. These less fortunate assistants have to deal with a variety of boogeymen. While not every waking second in these teenagers’ lives is a total nightmare; their own homes and schools are temporary refuges. A.Bateson the other hand, found a way to ensure that a babysitter is in a constant state of terror. In the author’s 1991 novel Help for the mother, a 17-year-old accepts a high-paying but unusual job offer; she is hired to babysit full time. The only catch is that the nanny job requires you to stay on a small island, far from home… and always close to danger.

Rebecca “Becky” Collier finds an excuse to leave Seattle for the summer after her boyfriend dumps her for her best friend. And with her leaving for college soon, the soon-to-be freshman needs to make some quick cash. So when Mrs. Nelson provides a stone for two birds, Becky hops on a plane to Sebastian Island. The gig itself – watching over a little boy named Devon all summer – is easy enough, but after a while Becky tires of Devon’s demanding mother.

Mrs. Nelson is visibly uncomfortable with her own son, and she is reluctant to let Becky leave the house. Making things stranger is why the Nelsons are in Sebastian in the first place. Someone has threatened Devon, and his parents – Devon’s father has been away all this time – think keeping him here is the best option. As eager as Becky is to ignore all the red flags for a mouth-watering $5,000 lump sum, the growing isolation eats away at her. On top of that, there’s the handsome but suspicious townsman and neighbor, Cleve Davidson, who keeps asking Becky so many prying questions.

Once she gets the night off, Becky’s mind starts racing. Along with the sheriff’s convenient accident, which effectively leaves the town of South End without any law enforcement, Becky questions Cleve’s innocence. His incessant curiosity about Becky’s work and her “aunt” suggests that he is not who he appears to be. Ms. Nelson herself is just as dodgy, if not more so. She not only forbids Becky from answering the phone in her office when she’s not home – a room Bates compares to the forbidden one in the French folktale “Bluebeard” – her daily work meetings are nothing plus she’s sitting alone at the marina. For someone who claims to be hiding, Mrs. Nelson really doesn’t know how to stay hidden.

From Becky feeling like a prisoner in the Nelsons’ summer home to her growing anxiety about Devon’s stalker, Help for the mother is all about the horrors within. Becky suffers the effects of cabin fever early on; her irritability and paranoia cause her to make rash decisions as the story progresses. Then, being aware of Devon’s predicament makes Becky suspicious and nervous. The more she gets entangled in the Nelson problem, the more she internalizes their fears.

When it comes to scares, Bates largely channels the psychological menace of classic “women in peril” movies as opposed to the teenage slashers influencing other suspenseful YA novels from the same era. She plays on Becky’s dread with a phone that keeps ringing but not answering, and she perpetuates the feeling of being watched. At one point, the author terrorizes the protagonist with strategically placed dolls; some are broken and mangled, while the most fearsome of them all is completely unscathed. A great line about this incident sums up Becky’s uneasy state of mind:

“This doll was perfect – no cuts, no broken, broken heads, no torn limbs – and somehow it was even scarier.

Almost like it was a blank threat, Becky thought. Fill it with anything I can imagine.

Family thrillers were all the rage in Hollywood when Help for the mother was first published. Sinister guardians, abandoned lovers, and bad seeds were just some of the threats found in these now dated accounts. Regardless of how they did it, the would-be villains sought to destroy the family. This book predates the cinematic peak of the subgenre, which includes The hand that rocks the cradle, poison ivyand mother’s boys. Unlike those movies, however, Bates’ story details the aftermath of a crime. Of course this facet is not realized until the last act.

Mrs. Nelson eventually gives in to Becky’s questions and admits that she is running away from Franklin, her abusive husband. The women devise a plan in anticipation of Franklin’s arrival; Becky hides the baby elsewhere while Mrs. Nelson distracts her husband. As expected, things don’t go as planned. This is due to Mrs. Nelson lying about everything. Devon is not his child; he is the biological son of Franklin and his current wife. Becky’s client took the baby and then fled to this island, where she put everything, including the rental house and the checking account, in the nanny’s name. And to make sure he wouldn’t alert the proper authorities, Ms. Nelson hurt the sheriff and let the town think Cleve was responsible.

Caroline B. Cooney exercised the “stolen baby” plotline a year earlier in her Janie Johnson series, beginning with The face on the milk carton. However, Help for the mother executes the idea very differently. The result is a greater shock to the target audience, as the twist is delivered near the end rather than at the beginning as in Cooney’s book. Young readers identify with Becky, who, like them, would never suspect a mother lying about being a parent. The thriller plays with perception as well as the concept of who can be considered inherently trustworthy. That Becky would then become an accomplice to a kidnapping, albeit without her knowledge or consent, is appalling.

Despite being manipulated, lied to, and nearly killed, Becky remains compassionate. She understands that Mrs. Nelson needs a different kind of help now. As she confronts the woman at the marina, Becky is sympathetic instead of angry. She eventually lets Mrs. Nelson escape and tells her to “be safe”. Letting the antagonist, especially someone with a mental illness, live in these kinds of stories is both merciful and uncommon. It’s also not the most logical or even legal choice to make, but it suits Becky, a character whose fatal flaw is caring too much.


There was a time when the children’s section of bookstores was overflowing with horror and suspense. These books were easily identifiable by their flashy fonts and garish covers. This notable subgenre of YA fiction flourished in the 80s, peaked in the 90s, and then finally came to an end in the early 2000s. YA horror of this genre is indeed a thing of the past, but the stories endure at buried in a book. This recurring column reflects the nostalgic novels that still haunt readers decades later.

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