Scientific Theories – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 22:08:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Scientific Theories – Michigan Paranormal Encounters http://michiganparanormalencounters.com/ 32 32 Scientists who rejected the theory of lab leaks linked to Wuhan lab: report https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/scientists-who-rejected-the-theory-of-lab-leaks-linked-to-wuhan-lab-report/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/scientists-who-rejected-the-theory-of-lab-leaks-linked-to-wuhan-lab-report/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 18:50:20 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/scientists-who-rejected-the-theory-of-lab-leaks-linked-to-wuhan-lab-report/ London, September 14 (IANS) Scientists who dismissed the theory that Covid-19 had leaked from the Chinese Institute of Virology in Wuhan (WIV) had links to the infamous laboratory, according to media reports. All but one of the scientists who signed a letter published in The Lancet on March 7 last year rejecting the theory of […]]]>

London, September 14 (IANS) Scientists who dismissed the theory that Covid-19 had leaked from the Chinese Institute of Virology in Wuhan (WIV) had links to the infamous laboratory, according to media reports.

All but one of the scientists who signed a letter published in The Lancet on March 7 last year rejecting the theory of lab leaks had ties to Chinese researchers, their colleagues or donors, The Telegraph reported.

The Lancet letter, signed by 27 scientists and initiated by British zoologist Peter Daszak, effectively ended scientific debate over whether the coronavirus was manipulated or disclosed from the Chinese lab.

Daszak is the chairman of the US-based nonprofit EcoHealth Alliance which has a direct connection to China. The firm has also funded research at the WIV.

The signatories said they “strongly condemned conspiracy theories” surrounding the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, according to the report.

The shocking revelation, made using an access to information request, revealed that an email sent by Daszak on February 8 revealed that he had been invited to write the letter by “our staff. “in China for a” demonstration of support “.

While Daszak ultimately declared his involvement in the EcoHealth Alliance, he failed to mention that five other signatories were also working for the organization, Express.co.uk said citing the newspaper.

In addition, three of the Lancet letter’s signatories were from the UK Wellcome Trust, which also funded work at the WIV. One of the signatories, Sir Jeremy Farrar, a member of Sage and director of the Trust, describes George Gao, head of the Wuhan Center for Disease Control, as an “old friend”.

Gao, who is also a former Wellcome Trust research assistant, had backed Daszak’s appointment to the National Academy of Sciences, according to the report.

Even after almost two years since Covid-19 was first detected in the Chinese city of Wuhan, the question of the origin of the virus still remains unanswered. Numerous claims have been made by several scientists and governments around the world. The recent U.S. intelligence report also couldn’t give a definitive conclusion as to whether the new coronavirus spread naturally to humans or whether it was the result of a lab leak.

Meanwhile, claims of US involvement have also been strong.

A new book by Australian investigative journalist Sharri Markson claimed American money funded Wuhan’s infamous virology lab. The book also claimed that controversial research to make diseases more potent was supported by Anthony Fauci, America’s leading infectious disease expert, Markson wrote in The Times.

Likewise, more than 3,000 pages of emails from Fauci’s work during the pandemic between January and June 2020, obtained by the Washington Post, Buzzfeed News and CNN via the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), raised the question. whether he supported Chinese denials of the theory that Covid-19 escaped from a laboratory in Wuhan.

–IANS

rvt / arm

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The afterlife is having a moment. ‘Beyond’ will help Christians and non-believers discuss what lies beyond the grave. https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/the-afterlife-is-having-a-moment-beyond-will-help-christians-and-non-believers-discuss-what-lies-beyond-the-grave/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/the-afterlife-is-having-a-moment-beyond-will-help-christians-and-non-believers-discuss-what-lies-beyond-the-grave/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 20:54:21 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/the-afterlife-is-having-a-moment-beyond-will-help-christians-and-non-believers-discuss-what-lies-beyond-the-grave/ The afterlife is having a moment. Over the past two years, no less than three high-profile books by eminent intellectuals have explored the history and ethics of Heaven and Hell. As David Bentley Hart sought to challenge the justice of eternal damnation in May all be saved and Bart Ehrman argued in Heaven and hell […]]]>

The afterlife is having a moment.

Over the past two years, no less than three high-profile books by eminent intellectuals have explored the history and ethics of Heaven and Hell. As David Bentley Hart sought to challenge the justice of eternal damnation in May all be saved and Bart Ehrman argued in Heaven and hell that Christianity invented its afterlife with the limited help of Jesus, the new book by Catherine Wolff Beyond is a smoother and more personal journey. In it, she mixes well-written impressionist summaries from various religious perspectives with personal anecdotes to answer the age-old question of what lies beyond the grave.

Beyondby Catherine Wolff

River head
352p 28 $

This book is not for anyone who wants to understand what a religious group thinks or believes about the afterlife. For this you will need a small library. It holds promise for the non-linear reader, however, who wants to delve into a collection of beautifully curated vignettes on particular thinkers or topics. For example, if you wanted to learn in about three pages what Islam really says about jihad and the “seventy-two virgins” mentioned in the Quran, Wolff has you covered.

More than anything else, Wolff is a reassuring guide for the spiritually curious Christian. She often relies on anecdotes and conversations with friends and colleagues, which isn’t necessarily a weakness, as her coterie is filled with awesome scholars and thought leaders. A talented curator, Wolff has synthesized, organized and summarized these key thinkers and perspectives into small, easily digestible chapters.

More than anything else, Catherine Wolff is a reassuring guide for the spiritually curious Christian.

Although this is not a story from the afterlife, Beyond is organized chronologically. Starting with the Neanderthals and what Wolff calls “primitive” religion, we discover shamanic and indigenous beliefs. From there we move on to “ancient religion,” the eternally popular theories of the Egyptians and Mesopotamians regarding the afterlife, then at breakneck speed through Judaism to Christianity, and then to Islam. Hinduism and Buddhism are found in part six. Part Seven mixes science, psychedelics, transhumanism, and near-death experiences into a tidy final section on our present day.

The scope of the book is bold but not Promethean, for it is heavily trafficked terrain. The afterword tells us what Wolff herself knew from the start: “There are no definitive answers” ​​and we should be open to the many potential ways to experience the divine. Whether this encounter takes place through prayer, meditation, rituals or hallucinogenic substances is up to us.

At the heart of this book is an admirable desire to demonstrate that the secular and the spiritual do not have to be strongly separated from each other. Christians do not have to be afraid of the religious and spiritual matters of others. Science is not the proverbial bogeyman. Even the Eleusinian Mysteries, banned by Christian Emperor Theodosius I in AD 392, are presented as friendly attempts to answer eternal questions. The open, ecumenical spirit of the book is contagious and engaging. Non-Christians, those simply curious about spirituality, cafeteria Catholics, and hearty Lutherans will have a lot to think about and discuss.

While the personal anecdotes that punctuate the book refresh Wolff’s eloquent but rich summaries of various arguments and thinkers, they also dilute the quality of the material. Wolff makes a conscious choice to “rely on believers” rather than scholars, but some specifics and details have been lost along the way. Although scholarly, the book often falls into broad generalizations.

Ideas about the afterlife tell us more about the hopes, fears and priorities of those who speak than about Heaven and Hell.

I teach classes on the afterlife every year and tell my students that ideas about the afterlife tell us more about the hopes, fears and priorities of those who speak than about heaven and the ‘hell. In this regard, Wolff is no exception. As she protests that this is not a story, she organizes her discussion of various theories about the afterlife as if it were and made some revealing choices about what to do. include and when.

For example, the section on Christianity is almost twice as long as any other section and remains a touchstone throughout the book. (To his credit, Wolff is honest about his Christian bias.) Native religions collect only a few paragraphs at the very beginning of the book, alongside a discussion of “primitive people.” We are making progress in an intellectual ascent towards modern science, bypassing the ancient philosophers who also asked scientific questions about cosmology and the afterlife.

The truth is that humans of all ages believed they were about to discover the secrets of eternal life. We are not that special.

Perhaps that’s why I selfishly wish Wolff could have approached the oppressive structural hierarchies at play in descriptions of the afterlife in a more systematic way. While she briefly discusses Muslim theories on the moral inferiority of women, she does not mention the early Christians, some of whom also questioned whether women should “become men” to enter the kingdom of God (e.g. , Gospel of thomas 114). Likewise, her brief discussion of Swedenborg’s idea of ​​women as heavenly guardians fails to recognize that this expands and reflects something dark and patriarchal: In Ezra’s Latin view, women are doomed for not having breastfed the children of strangers.

Gender, disability, race, identity and power have recently been the subject of major afterlife books by Meghan Henning and Taylor Petrey. (Full disclosure, I wrote about disability and the eradication of identity in Heaven myself.) Ideas about the afterlife can cause harm and bring comfort, so it’s disappointing that Wolff do not think about the types of life, experiences and bodies implicitly devalued in his presentation of his own view of the sky. Although Wolff’s book is more of a quest than a historical narrative, every pilgrim should be aware of the environmental costs they incur on behalf of others on their journey.

The missed opportunities, however, are surely not Wolff’s fault – who writes clearly and has done enormous amounts of research – but is due to the scope of the project. If the truth about what happens when we die is unknowable, then documenting this truth in 300 pages is impossible. Fortunately, Wolff suggests, we have forever to explore its intricacies.

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EUSM publishes research showing how early implementation of social distancing measures in Saint-Louis saved lives https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/eusm-publishes-research-showing-how-early-implementation-of-social-distancing-measures-in-saint-louis-saved-lives/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/eusm-publishes-research-showing-how-early-implementation-of-social-distancing-measures-in-saint-louis-saved-lives/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 04:40:53 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/eusm-publishes-research-showing-how-early-implementation-of-social-distancing-measures-in-saint-louis-saved-lives/ The Washington University School of Medicine published the study on September 1. The Washington University School of Medicine released a study this month concluding that the first health orders issued by public authorities in St. Louis likely averted thousands of hospitalizations and deaths, saving the city from a crisis. much more important. The study, led […]]]>

The Washington University School of Medicine published the study on September 1.

The Washington University School of Medicine released a study this month concluding that the first health orders issued by public authorities in St. Louis likely averted thousands of hospitalizations and deaths, saving the city from a crisis. much more important.

The study, led by Washington University professor of medicine Dr. Elvin H. Geng, found that a delay of just two weeks in implementing social distancing measures would have resulted in a “total increase nearly six times of deaths, “using a model of the COVID-19 pandemic in accordance with Saint-Louis demographics and policies. Such a short delay could have created a situation resembling that of a more severely affected area, such as New York City.

The study also concluded that, among several behavioral theories, immediacy is the most crucial element in creating a successful public health procedure.

Medical anthropologist and University of Washington professor David Ansari, who was not part of the study, said the research was not just another part of academic group thinking, but was rather very relevant for an effective public health policy.

“I think we can generalize from these results and see that, if certain measures had been put in place even earlier, it could have had a very different effect, which would have resulted in saving lives and protecting people against this truly dangerous pandemic. “said Ansari.

If the response were delayed by a week, the study calculates that the number of deaths as of April 15, 2020 would have reached a median projection of 219 instead of the number actually observed, 115. As a result, large cities like New York and Boston can learn from St. Louis, where county and city officials acted quickly by issuing health orders before the severity of the pandemic became apparent.

“When an epidemic takes off, at that point, it is important for leaders to have the courage to make a decision that might be unpopular and to do so before it becomes obvious,” Geng said. “There are cases in America where we have done it [issuing health orders] too late. New York City did it too late. There were tons of people saying we had to shut things down, and New York waited and waited until the hospitals filled up, by then it was too late. By the time it is obvious, it is too late.

The state of Missouri, its more rural counties in particular, also lagged behind St. Louis, underscoring the disparity between health orders in different regions.

“I think there was [a disconnect]”Geng said.” The severity of the epidemic is worse in rural areas than in urban areas. Part of the reason is that people living in urban areas were more likely to change their behavior over time. . “

“I think Missouri would do much better in terms of numbers, both in terms of infections but also in terms of deaths, if approaches similar to those implemented in St. Louis and surrounding communities were followed. “said Ansari.

Ansari also argued that disparities in vaccination rates between St. Louis and Missouri overall had an even worse impact than disparities in public health orders. At the time of publication, Missouri has 26 counties with vaccination rates below 30%.

Ansari explained that the unvaccinated population of Missouri affects the vaccinated population both by allowing the virus to continue to spread, as well as having a demoralizing effect on the vaccinated population.

“We have to have a certain threshold in the general vaccinated population in order to achieve a certain level of safety,” he said. “Knowing that a significant part of the state is not even approaching that threshold, I think it takes a kind of psychological toll, more broadly. “

An emerging area of ​​research focuses on why people or do not follow public health orders or get vaccinated. Dr James Stellar, professor of behavioral neuroscience at the University of Albany, argues that emotion plays an important role in these decisions.

“The emotional brain circuits that you carry with you influence your cognitive decisions and often in ways that you don’t understand,” Stellar said. “Here, I think what happened is people became tribal. “It’s my tribe telling me not to do this. [This logic] often happens unconsciously.

Because of this emotional element, Stellar argued that some public health decisions are best made at the local level, as people are more likely to listen to someone they feel they know and trust.

“If these orders come from above, they could have the opposite effect. People will think, ‘Oh, it’s just the government pushing me,’ ”Stellar said.

Another conclusion of the study is that local decisions matter as much, if not more, than those taken at the national level. However, Ansari admitted that large-scale national planning also brings some benefits.

“I think it’s important to respond to needs and resources in a local context, but at the same time, if we had a cohesive approach that was nationally driven in this country, we would have been much better in terms of where we are with the pandemic now, ”Ansari said.

Geng said that the fight against anti-science and contempt for public health is “a lasting struggle.” However, he maintained the importance of scientific research centers, such as the School of Medicine, in the production of knowledge.

“People generally believe what they believe, and if you look on the Internet, you can find evidence to support anything you want to believe,” Geng said. “I’m not totally hopeful that a study based on an epidemiological model will change a lot of opinions. On the flip side, I still think science has a role to play in society and hopefully we’ll get to a point in the future where we can have these conversations. “

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Why are lights seen during earthquakes? That said science https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-lights-seen-during-earthquakes-that-said-science/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-lights-seen-during-earthquakes-that-said-science/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:13:44 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-lights-seen-during-earthquakes-that-said-science/ Everyone Comes to the Earthquake Videos on social media tend to be broadcast by strange lights appearing in the sky a few minutes before the earthquake. They are also usually seen moments after earthquakes. It’s as common as “Earthquake fires” Here we explain what they are. Perhaps when those earthquake videos went viral before the […]]]>

Everyone Comes to the Earthquake Videos on social media tend to be broadcast by strange lights appearing in the sky a few minutes before the earthquake. They are also usually seen moments after earthquakes. It’s as common as “Earthquake fires” Here we explain what they are.

Perhaps when those earthquake videos went viral before the September 19, 2017 earthquake, when recordings of these lights flooded Twitter and Facebook, always accompanied by crazy theories.

In fact, unlike what you read on networks, these spotlights have nothing to do with sci-fi or conspiracy theories, and more of a geology.

earthquake lights

The lightning we see in the sky is a phenomenon studied for centuries and known asearthquake lights(Earthquake Light, or EQL, for its acronym), lights in the sky seen similarly, but on a smaller scale, than the Northern Lights.

The most plausible theory to explain this phenomenon was formulated by Friedmann Freund, a scientist from NASA, who discovered that these lights come from the significant increase in the electrical charge of the Earth as the Earth’s crust moves.

This is how Freund explains in one of his writings of scientific articles:

“When the stones of the earth’s crust grow and bend under the action of tectonic forces, latent electromagnetic charges are released and lead to a remarkable variety of phenomena, which are part of the folklore associated with them in different parts of the world. These phenomena range from abnormal electrical and magnetic signals to seismic lights as hilltops light up and strange behaviors are generated in animals. […] All for one reason: to awaken and spread charges that naturally hide in the deepest rocks of the Earth. “

What are they?

If we put it simply, the lights in the sky are generated by landslides near geological faults on Earth that produce earthquakes, generating an unusual electrical charge due to the enormous friction.

The rocks that make up the geological faults act as conductors of electricity, which is then released in this amazing way in something known as tribolumiscencia.

Just because they are the product of the friction of large geological faults, the lights in the sky usually appear before and after a strong earthquake.

So, in some cases, they can help us know when a strong earthquake is approaching a few minutes before it happens and give us time to get to safety.

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Why are vaccination rates so low? https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-vaccination-rates-so-low/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-vaccination-rates-so-low/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:53:44 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/why-are-vaccination-rates-so-low/ “The 360” shows you various perspectives on the main stories and debates of the day. What is happening Of all the groups with low immunization rates in the United States, one of the most worrying for public health officials is pregnant women. While nearly 75 percent of adults in the United States have received at […]]]>

“The 360” shows you various perspectives on the main stories and debates of the day.

What is happening

Of all the groups with low immunization rates in the United States, one of the most worrying for public health officials is pregnant women. While nearly 75 percent of adults in the United States have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, only about 24 percent received one during their pregnancy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. .

This low rate comes despite growing evidence that pregnant women face a higher risk of serious COVID-19 infections than the general population. “It is very clear that there are very serious adverse outcomes for mother and baby during COVID-19 infection,” Dr Anthony Fauci said last month.

Doctors across the country are reporting unprecedented numbers of pregnant women in intensive care units in recent months. COVID-19 infections also increase the likelihood of preterm labor, according to the CDC, and may be linked to other negative pregnancy outcomes.

All the evidence suggests that vaccines are safe for pregnant or breastfeeding women, despite widespread online conspiracy theories falsely linking vaccines to infertility and miscarriages. In fact, studies have shown that babies can receive antibodies to the vaccine in utero or through breast milk.

Why there is debate

Considering the benefits of vaccination and the high risk of infection, why are so few pregnant women getting vaccinated? While factors that contribute to vaccine resistance in the general population are certainly part of the answer, experts believe there are several reasons specific to pregnancy that make the problem worse.

One of the main reasons, according to many experts, is the lack of clarity from public health authorities on the safety of vaccines during pregnancy. It is standard practice for clinical trials of vaccines and pharmaceuticals not to include pregnant women due to the risk of unknown side effects. But in the case of COVID vaccines, this omission meant doctors until recently did not have a solid body of scientific data on vaccine safety during pregnancy. The CDC only officially recommended vaccines for pregnant women last month, and the World Health Organization still recommends them only under certain circumstances.

This lack of clear information from health officials has allowed false claims about vaccine safety risks to take hold, according to disinformation experts. These conspiracy theories, they claim, are especially powerful because of the understandable concern pregnant women have for the health of children – a concern many say is exacerbated by how our healthcare system has made pregnant women vulnerable though. before the onset of the pandemic.

Viewpoints

Conspiracy theories filled information void created by health officials

“Without the clear endorsement of the medical community and the anti-vaccine lies surpassing the mommyverse via Instagram, Reddit and Facebook, thousands of expectant parents have decided to wait – either until they give birth or until they give birth. until they reach the third trimester. ” – Sonja Sharp, Los Angeles Times

Vaccines are just another example of how our healthcare system is failing women

Tackling concerns about vaccines and fertility will require not only debunking the misinformation involved, but also tackling the ways the medical system has failed American women – and allowed an amorphous culture of wellbeing to develop. melt and fill the void. ” – Anna North, Vox

Well-intentioned safety concerns during trials left pregnant women vulnerable

“When new vaccines are in development, manufacturers routinely test them on healthy adults first and then move to more vulnerable demographic groups. Pregnant and breastfeeding people and children are usually the last on the list. It was born out of a desire to protect, but it often ends up creating an enigma. If pregnant women were not included in clinical trials, how would they know if it is safe to get the vaccine? – Helen Branswell, STAT

Until recently, there were no clear guidelines from health authorities

“For many pregnant people, the decision to get the COVID-19 vaccine has been a heavy one. Clinical trials do not include pregnant women for ethical reasons, so there was initially no data from us regarding vaccines. But we were still eligible for the shot. – Kelly Lawler, USA Today

Vaccine developers made a major mistake by being overly cautious in clinical trials

“What a lot of people forget is that there are risks in doing nothing. Not offering pregnant women the opportunity to be vaccinated and to protect themselves, where there are known and severe risks of Covid amplified by pregnancy, is not a wise strategy. – Denise Jamieson, obstetrician, to the New York Times

The worries that cross everyone’s mind are exacerbated for pregnant women

“It was this proven faith in the nature of older and more familiar vaccines that made me nervous about taking the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy. What if there were unforeseen effects down the line? What if, for example, I got the vaccine and our daughter developed birth defects as a result? My brain started to speed up in irrational directions, despite the data showing no increased risk of birth defects from the vaccine. “- Charlotte Alter, Temps

The increased risks of infection have not been adequately explained

“Healthcare systems also need to provide unvarnished evidence demonstrating the risk of serious complications and potential outcomes in a way that resonates with their patients. This conversation must include a reminder that the recent wave of COVID-19 is affecting young, healthy pregnant women with no underlying disease or risk factors. »- Mark Simon, La Colline

Doctors need to be honest about the real uncertainty that exists with vaccines

“We need to meet our patients where they are and be clear about why we can talk about vaccines so confidently. No, doctors can’t say for sure that there will never be long-term consequences from a coronavirus vaccine, but we can point out that there is no scientific reason to fear them either. , given our decades of experience with a myriad of other vaccinations. – Leana S. Wen, Washington Post

Is there a subject you would like to see covered in “The 360”? Send your suggestions to the360@yahoonews.com.

Photographic illustration: Yahoo News; photos: Getty Images

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China to develop quantum radar to detect stealth jets https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/china-to-develop-quantum-radar-to-detect-stealth-jets/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/china-to-develop-quantum-radar-to-detect-stealth-jets/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 21:18:53 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/china-to-develop-quantum-radar-to-detect-stealth-jets/ The late Carl Sagan once said, “Extraordinary allegations require extraordinary evidence. “ And Chinese scientists are reportedly developing new quantum radar technology that could detect stealth planes by creating a small electromagnetic storm, according to a recent study published in the Speed ​​camera log, a peer-reviewed publication based in China, reports the South China Morning […]]]>

The late Carl Sagan once said, “Extraordinary allegations require extraordinary evidence. “

And Chinese scientists are reportedly developing new quantum radar technology that could detect stealth planes by creating a small electromagnetic storm, according to a recent study published in the Speed ​​camera log, a peer-reviewed publication based in China, reports the South China Morning Post.

However, this is not the first time that Chinese researchers have made big claims about a functioning quantum radar, and many experts from other countries dispute the very feasibility of such devices, suggesting that it could represent a technological bluff.

So take this with a grain of salt.

China makes big claims on working ‘quantum radar’

Conventional radars have a fixed or rotating dish, but the design of quantum radar is more like a cannon and accelerates electrons to almost the speed of light. Once they pass through a coil tube exposed to strong magnetic fields, the electrons could generate a vortex of microwaves that swirl forward like a horizontal tornado, according to the report. If completed, the new quantum radar system would outperform any radar system of the past, but it’s still a big “if,” according to Zhang Chao of Tsinghua University and his team at the aerospace engineering school. But the potential benefits are worth the hard work, according to the team of scientists. The better the “stealth technology, the higher the gain” of the quantum radar system, they added, in the SCMP report.

However, the fundamental particles used in this man-made electromagnetic storm would exhibit strange properties, the researchers added. In the study, each particle retained a spiraling momentum that did not decrease over time and the distance increased. Einstein’s work speculates that this is not physically possible, but the researchers pointed out that quantum mechanics bypassed the theories of the late physicist, allowing the system to detect targets that conventional radars would never see. And it works not only at long distance, but also in bad weather.

‘Quantum Radar’ Might Actually Be China’s Bluff

If the system really works and is implemented in contested airspace, it could become a significant advantage. Even today, most planes cannot conceal their signature from radar because they reflect electromagnetic waves. Stealth planes like the US’s F-22 Raptor or F-35 fighter jets, for example, absorb much of the radar waves through a special coating material which, combined with minimal right angles in the outer structure of the aircraft. vehicle, can reduce a radar signal to an object the size of a baseball. Stealth technology like this has proven to be a clear advantage over the air power of other countries that mainly rely on 20th century jet fighters devoid of stealth features.

However, in recent years the sensitivity of military radars has increased, perhaps high enough to detect even stealth aircraft. But, in turn, the new metamaterials further improved stealth capabilities, further reducing aircraft visibility. And, if stealth technology continues to improve, some believe it will exceed the detection capabilities of any radar. This is why weapons engineers proposed quantum radar as a potential solution to the detection dilemma more than a decade ago. Chinese military scientists have said they are already testing a prototype quantum radar in 2016, but this has been hotly contested by legitimate scientific authorities. A report published in Scientific journal Last year, he argued that quantum radar may never be deployed for long-range uses like tracking stealth aircraft, as experiments have revealed critical flaws – one of which suggested such devices may not. operate only near absolute zero – which obviously well below the temperature of the Chinese sky. “I am convinced that when [China] announced that their quantum radar was not working, ”said Fabrice Boust, radar specialist and physicist from the French aerospace agency, ONERA, in the 2020 Scientific journal report. “But they knew they would get a reaction.” Well, if that’s what China wants, it works.

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What Intelligence Community Report Says About COVID-19 Laboratory Leak Theory https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/what-intelligence-community-report-says-about-covid-19-laboratory-leak-theory/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/what-intelligence-community-report-says-about-covid-19-laboratory-leak-theory/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 20:18:48 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/what-intelligence-community-report-says-about-covid-19-laboratory-leak-theory/ The intelligence community’s report on the origin of COVID-19 neither blamed the Wuhan Institute of Virology nor exonerated the Chinese lab. After 90 days of “redoubling” efforts to bring the world closer to how the pandemic began, the intelligence community has still not been able to come to a consensus on the origin. While much […]]]>

The intelligence community’s report on the origin of COVID-19 neither blamed the Wuhan Institute of Virology nor exonerated the Chinese lab.

After 90 days of “redoubling” efforts to bring the world closer to how the pandemic began, the intelligence community has still not been able to come to a consensus on the origin. While much of the report is still classified, the summary that has been released shows that the hypothesis of a lab leak cannot be ruled out, leaving the world essentially in the same place it was months ago. .

What the intelligence community has come to a consensus on is that the virus was not developed as a biological weapon. Most agencies have united around the belief that it was not genetically modified, although two agencies believe there is not “sufficient evidence” to assess this possibility anyway.

At least one agency that contributed to the report said it had “moderate confidence” that the pandemic started as a laboratory-related incident, likely originating from the Wuhan Institute of Virology. Four other agencies said they believed the pandemic was occurring naturally and three were unable to side with either hypothesis as some analysts favored one origin or another and some believed both were also likely.

To come to a “conclusive assessment” of the origin of COVID-19, the intelligence community has said it will likely need China’s cooperation. However, the report noted China’s resistance to further investigations, as well as its reluctance to share information and blame the United States for the outbreak.

“These actions reflect, in part, the Chinese government’s own uncertainty as to where an investigation might lead as well as its frustration that the international community is using the issue to exert political pressure on China,” the report said.

At the start of the pandemic, scientists dismissed a lab leak as a fringe conspiracy theory that should be avoided due to the blame it might throw on Chinese scientists. While many scientists still believe this is the least likely explanation for the pandemic, investigations into all possible theories have been supported in recent months.

Much of what has fueled the recent increase in support for examining the laboratory leak theory are reports that Chinese scientists were sick with flu-like symptoms in the fall of 2019. China has denied that researchers at the Wuhan Institute of Virology had COVID-19, which, if true, would make it very difficult for the virus to escape from the lab.

The joint WHO-China mission has been tasked with trying to identify the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic. After weeks of research, the team determined that the most likely scenario was for COVID-19 to evolve naturally from animals to humans, and the least likely scenario was for the virus to come from a lab.

After another investigation into the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic, the intelligence community still has a number of questions it would like to have answered. On February 3, security personnel stand guard outside the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan as members of the World Health Organization (WHO) team investigating the origins of the COVID-19 coronavirus. visit the institute in Wuhan, in central China’s Hubei province, on February 3.
Hector Retamal / AFP / Getty Images

World Health Organization Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus noted that the team had problems accessing data while in China and some expressed concerns that the report was based on information provided by China.

In an interview with Lesley Stahl of CBS, Peter Daszak, who was part of the WHO-China mission team, said there were Foreign Ministry staff in the room “at the very least. throughout our stay “. He said they were there to make sure that “everything was going well on the Chinese side.”

Stahl countered, saying Chinese officials may be in the room to make sure scientists and researchers aren’t “telling you the whole truth and nothing but the truth.” Daszak denied that there was any reason to believe the people they worked with were covering up anything and said the team had “no problem” distinguishing between a political and a scientific statement.

Other efforts to investigate the origin of COVID-19 have stalled, according to experts who have been summoned by the WHO to investigate the problem. In a commentary in the journal Nature, the team reiterated that their Chinese counterparts were “reluctant to share raw data” due to concerns about patient privacy and pushed for further investigation.

“The window of opportunity to conduct this crucial investigation is closing quickly: any delay will make some of the studies biologically impossible. Understanding the origins of a devastating pandemic is a global, science-based priority,” the team wrote.

China has denied being responsible for blocking the process and Fu Cong, director general of China’s Foreign Ministry, said the country “has always supported and will continue to participate in science-based origin search efforts.”

Chinese authorities have also questioned the role of the intelligence community in tracing the origin. Cong said on Wednesday that blaming China for the pandemic would meet with a “counterattack.”

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Science quietly wins one of the right’s long-standing culture wars https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/science-quietly-wins-one-of-the-rights-long-standing-culture-wars/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/science-quietly-wins-one-of-the-rights-long-standing-culture-wars/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 22:23:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/science-quietly-wins-one-of-the-rights-long-standing-culture-wars/ The bitter culture wars over teaching evolution in public schools dominated headlines throughout the 2000s, in large part because of the Bush administration’s ease with evangelicals who rejected science. on evolution. Yet move forward to 2021 – when the acrimonious battle over science has shifted from evolution to pandemic public health – and few young […]]]>

The bitter culture wars over teaching evolution in public schools dominated headlines throughout the 2000s, in large part because of the Bush administration’s ease with evangelicals who rejected science. on evolution. Yet move forward to 2021 – when the acrimonious battle over science has shifted from evolution to pandemic public health – and few young people are likely to have any idea what even “smart design” means. Oddly enough, despite the right to grasp the science and immunology of face masks as new battlegrounds in the culture wars, the struggle for evolution is all but forgotten. In fact, for many Americans it is completely forgotten.

While it might seem hard to believe, Americans are more scientifically educated than ever in 2021 – so much so that creationism has become a minority opinion. And Americans are also able to identify intelligent design and other forms of creationism as the inherently religious theories that they are.

We know this from a new study published in the journal Public Understanding of Science, which analyzed public opinion polls since 1985 and noticed a trend in attitudes towards evolution. As more and more Americans have become highly educated – graduating from college, taking science courses in college, displaying increasing levels of civic science literacy – acceptance of evolution has increased. Consequently.

From 1985 to 2010, there was a statistical deadlock among Americans who were asked if they agreed that “human beings, as we know them today, have developed. from previous animal species “. Acceptance then started to increase, becoming a majority position in 2016 and reaching 54% in 2019. Even 32% of religious fundamentalists accepted the evolution in 2019, a stark contrast to the only 8% who did. 1988. Eighty-three percent of Liberal Democrats said they accepted evolution, compared to just 34% of conservative Republicans.

“Almost twice as many Americans had a college degree in 2018 than in 1988,” University of Michigan researcher Dr. Mark Ackerman said in a statement. “It’s hard to get a college degree without gaining at least some respect for the success of science.”

The change in attitude towards evolution is particularly surprising given that teaching evolution was a major aspect of culture wars from the late 1980s to the 2000s, particularly during the Bush era when the evangelical right was ascending. In 2005, the then raging cultural war involved the so-called “smart design” theory and, more specifically, a textbook called “Pandas and People”.

At a decisive moment in the culture wars of the 1990s and 2000s, the school district board of the Dover area of ​​Pennsylvania asked its ninth grade biology teachers to refer their students to “Pandas and People.” because it encouraged smart design. By 1997, the strategy of using intelligent design as a Trojan horse for creationism had grown sufficiently to end up in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. Once there, however, the school district was told that their philosophy was indeed a form of “creation science” and equally scientifically invalid. When the Dover case was heard by the United States District Court for the Central District of Pennsylvania in 2005, a judge appointed by President George W. Bush sided with the plaintiffs and noted the irony. people who claim to be religious, dishonestly claiming that they did not admit to having a religious agenda.

“It is ironic that many of these individuals, who have so firmly and proudly touted their religious beliefs in public, lie over and over again to muddy the waters and disguise the real purpose behind the ID. [intelligent design] Policy, ”noted the judge in his decision.

Even though the Supreme Court had banned the teaching of creationism in the 1968 case Epperson v. Arkansas, nine other significant legal cases occurred between 1981 and 2005 (including those in Louisiana and Pennsylvania which were mentioned above). Despite the legal setbacks, teaching about evolution remained a hot topic during the 2000 presidential election. In 2005, Bush even legitimized the smart design movement by telling reporters that “both sides should be. properly taught ”and that“ part of education is exposing people to different schools of thought ”. His scientific advisor later added, although he did not want evolution to be taught as an alternative to evolution, “I think I ignore. [ID] in class is a mistake. As recently as 2014, popular science artist Bill Nye held a high-profile debate with young Earth creationist Ken Ham.

There is a long history of rejected evolution in the United States, although a generation of Americans didn’t even know they had a theory to be potentially scandalized about. While Charles Darwin’s classic book “On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection” made waves in his native Britain when it was released in 1859, the book did not arouse widespread anger in the United States. United until the end of the 19th century. The issue was particularly controversial among American Protestants, who by this time were divided into Modernist and Evangelical camps. By the 1920s, the theory of evolution had been linked in the public mind to other “modern” intellectual tendencies which they found unpleasant, from Marxism to psychology. Fundamentalists pushed to ban the teaching of evolution in public schools since – as former Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan said – the theory would convince future generations that the Bible was simply “a collection. of myths ”.

Bryan got the chance to test his point in court during the Scopes trial, when he faced off as an expert Bible witness against legendary lawyer Clarence Darrow. American journalist HL Mencken contemptuously wrote about the inevitability of Darrow’s defeat and overwhelming support for anti-scientific theories, yelling that “obscenities such as the upcoming Tennessee evolutionist trial, if not used to nothing else, at least attracting attention dramatically. to the fact that enlightenment among mankind is very narrowly dispersed. ”

This exchange, dramatized in the play “Inherit the Wind”, turned public opinion against Bryan, but ultimately did not dampen anti-evolutionary movements, which gained new success after his banning in Arkansas and Mississippi. A turning point did not come until the 1940s, when scientists in the United States came to a consensus that natural selection was the engine of evolution and explained the rise of human beings.

In 1947, the Supreme Court ruled in Everson v. Education Council that the First Amendment clause prohibiting the establishment of a religion applied to state governments, not just the federal government. As Judge Hugo Black wrote, teaching an explicitly theological doctrine like creationism meant that citizens were taxed for supporting a religious point of view.

“No tax of any amount, large or small, may be levied to support religious activities or institutions, whatever their name, or whatever form they take to teach or practice religion.” , Black said.


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The 1947 decision, which was reinforced in a series of other cases over the following decades, made it clear to opponents of evolution that they needed to adopt a different tactic. In the 1980s, a University of California, Berkeley law professor named Phillip E. Johnson proposed a concept known as “smart design”. He argues that the complexity of life on this planet is so precise that strictly naturalistic explanations cannot rationally explain them, and that scientists must recognize possible religious or supernatural causes. This movement, though dismissed by most scientists as a simple, rejuvenated attempt to teach creationism, has grown enough that in the 21st century many states are pushing for laws to allow for the teaching of creationism. smart design in public schools.

While it is welcome for scientists that acceptance of evolution continues to spread, fundamentalists still pose a threat to America’s overall scientific culture.

“Such beliefs are not only stubborn but also increasingly politicized,” senior researcher Jon D. Miller of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan said in a statement, noting the discrepancy. growing between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to basic science knowledge. .

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Institutional repositories help democratize access to older research | Nebraska today https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/institutional-repositories-help-democratize-access-to-older-research-nebraska-today/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/institutional-repositories-help-democratize-access-to-older-research-nebraska-today/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 05:23:00 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/institutional-repositories-help-democratize-access-to-older-research-nebraska-today/ Welcome to Pocket Science: An overview of recent research from Husker scientists and engineers. For those who want to quickly learn the “what”, “what then” and “what now” of Husker research. What? Although the older scientific literature contains seminal theories, discoveries, and methodologies that have shaped the contemporary landscapes of many areas of research, this […]]]>

Welcome to Pocket Science: An overview of recent research from Husker scientists and engineers. For those who want to quickly learn the “what”, “what then” and “what now” of Husker research.

What?

Although the older scientific literature contains seminal theories, discoveries, and methodologies that have shaped the contemporary landscapes of many areas of research, this research often becomes less accessible as it ages.

Those few who can accessing it – whether by checking it out in a college library collection or buying it at a discount from publishers – are often able to do so due to their physical proximity to it. This can distort access to people living in relatively developed countries, creating and perpetuating a cycle of information inequity.

So what?

Sue Ann Gardner, Paul Royster, and Linnea Fredrickson help manage the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Digital Commons, a globally recognized online repository with more than 119,000 full-text entries downloaded over 74 million times since 2005 .

The trio decided to examine the potential value of republishing scientific literature in institutional repositories, using Digital Commons in Nebraska as a case study. To do this, the Husker team analyzed the number and location of downloads of four sets of research papers: Insecta Mundi, Nebraska Bird Review, Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences, and University of Nebraska State research papers. Museum.

By the end of February 2021, the 3,859 entries in these four series had been downloaded over 1.25 million times, or approximately 325 times per item. About 31% of those downloads, spread across seven continents, came from countries designated as low and middle income by the World Bank.

Now what?

The results suggest that continuing to make older research literature freely available through online university and college repositories may help expand and democratize access to this research, the team said.

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Realistic magic https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/realistic-magic/ https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/realistic-magic/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 19:01:17 +0000 https://michiganparanormalencounters.com/realistic-magic/ IT IS NOT a narrative expedient for me to pretend that I can remember my first meeting with Shakespeare. I was living with my parents at the time. There was time to fill before dinner – empty times when I didn’t have the will or the need to take any action. I would kill this […]]]>
IT IS NOT a narrative expedient for me to pretend that I can remember my first meeting with Shakespeare. I was living with my parents at the time. There was time to fill before dinner – empty times when I didn’t have the will or the need to take any action. I would kill this time with little unnecessary gestures, like slapping my fingers against the backs of books gathered on my father’s shelves. This is how I brushed against the same shakespeare thorns complete works. I pulled out a volume, opened it at random, and started reading. I would be lying if I said I remember what it was, but I remember the feel of the pages, silky and very thin, typical of thick books like the Bible or, of course, Shakespeare.

In short, and having dinner on the side, I read one volume after another: tragedies, comedies, history plays. Maybe I skipped a few Henrys. Among the countless reasons why the poet occupied my mind, I mainly remember a feeling of familiarity with his writing, in which I felt comfortable despite being an Italian translation of works. 16th century English.

Many years later, reading Theater, Magic and Philosophy: William Shakespeare, John Dee and the Italian Legacy, by Gabriela Dragnea Horvath, clarified what I believed to be an elective affinity. The many themes brought together in this precious work meet against the background of the influence of Italian Renaissance philosophy on sixteenth-century English culture in general, and on Shakespeare in particular – the same author I met in the my father’s house in Florence, the birthplace of Italian Neoplatonism and Marsilio Ficino. This was the familiarity I had felt while reading: I didn’t just feel at home, I was.

Before delving into the complex work of Horvath, however, it is preferable to present its methodology, given its resonance with the content of the book. In a way, by writing about magic, the author expresses his own, thanks to his adoption of the comparative method typical of the Italian Renaissance. As Horvath puts it, his “inquiry does not unfold along a linear thesis that can be summed up in a single declarative sentence, but unfolds into a web of interrelated subjects.” It aims to

to restore the dynamics of cultural models, the play of existential and epistemological diagrams of an era, the orchestration of its creative energies in their diversity, their tension and their complementarity. It is coherent with the mental disposition of the beginnings of modernity, whose epistemology rested on the mirror, and where the resemblance gave coherence to the system of knowledge and to the world.

Nicolas de Cues had established in By docta ignorantia that any inquiry is comparative and uses the means of comparative relation. Horvath follows his path, comparing magic, drama and philosophy, discussing both the works of de Cusa and the writing of Shakespeare and John Dee.

Horvath argues that perennial philosophy, theater, and magic affected the onset of the modern mindset not only as separate realms, but also in their interdependence. It examines the structural commonalities of theater and magic and finds correspondences with the main affirmations of perennial philosophy; then it follows the rise of magic in high culture as applied knowledge. In doing so, Horvath seeks to – so to speak – resolve and coagulate John Dee and William Shakespeare, whose alchemical encounter generates the spell of the book, which highlights four points in common between magic, theater and perennial philosophy:

(1) the relationships between man, God, Nature and the arts, (2) the foundation in the sense of wonder and confidence in man’s ability to transform the world by producing artificial wonders, ( 3) dependence on invisible beings and the potential of the imagination and (4) awareness of the power of words.

Before Huxley fans get confused, we need to clarify that by “enduring philosophy” the author means a philosophy that does not care so much about the to look for for the truth, but with its revelation. This is the philosophy of Nicolas de Cues, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, which was inspired by Duns Scot, Iamblichus, Al-Ghazali, Plotinus, among others, and which was transmitted to Agrippa, Jakob Böhme and Giordano Bruno. This school of thought presents itself as a “universal science”, a perfect synthesis of theology, philosophy and poetry. Recall, with Horvath, that

an interesting feature of this trend is also the unity of theory and practice. The knowledge accessible by the philosopher was intended to be applied to the transformation of nature, hence the centrality of magic as an umbrella term for theories, rituals, experiments and the arts aimed at healing the world of his. state of decomposition, and the interest of philosophers in medicine, astrology, alchemy, applied mathematics, botany, physiognomy, optics and other disciplines which today come under the domain of science.

Interest in praxis and ritual is what brings the perennial philosophy closer to nature, as shown in the figure of John Dee, the English thinker who, together with his colleague Edward Kelley, developed the enochian language: a fictitious miraculous language dictated by angels. It’s the performances of Kelley, the cheating medium, in whom Dee really seemed to believe, that brings us to the third link: the theater.

Thinking of this controversial alchemist, I remember an untranslatable Italian expression, messa on stage (in French, as in English: staging). The Italian version means both “to stage a play” and “to make a fiction credible by deception”. Ambiguity is indeed embodied by Kelley – the connection between Dee and Shakespeare, magic and drama. Horvath explains that the affinities of theater, perennial philosophy and magic with religion are “structural”:

All have a ritualistic dimension, which explains their dynamic and performative quality: magic consists mainly of rituals, philosophers assimilated magical rituals to connect to the spiritual domain, and their experiments with substances, images or numbers as well as their Finding a method can be seen as a shift from the rituals of religion to the procedures of science and technology. The theater was performed as a ritual of justice with sacrificial victims, reproducing the religious ritual in a secular setting.

Elsewhere, Horvath observes that “in working with simulacra of reality which widened the realm of conceivability, theater has become merged with magic.” This explains Dee’s disguised presence in the Storm, one of his works with the greatest presence of magic. Horvath, however, refutes the established idea that Prospero is Dee’s literary portrait, providing textual evidence that he was most likely the inspiration for the Neapolitan nobleman Gonzalo, an honest old adviser. More than the sorcerer, therefore, for Shakespeare Dee, it is the man of good faith who is mistaken.

It is in the contact between sorcerer and playwright that the alchemy of Theater, Magic and Philosophy: William Shakespeare, John Dee and the Italian Legacy does its job. Like any playwright, Shakespeare viewed his art as intersubjective magic, and magicians like Dee worked on the same assumptions, using the imagination to reproduce and control natural phenomena. However, as Horvath writes:

The enthusiasm of Marsilio Ficino and Giovanni Pico for man’s ability to rise to divine status contaminated Dee to the point of making him believe he was a vessel of revelation from God. In contrast, Shakespeare’s view of man can be called skeptical realism. Rather than exalting man’s capacities, the continuous exercise of critical thinking expressed by his characters reveals human limits: ignorance, weak or perverted reason, ambition, abandonment to passions, mortality.

Dr. Dee continued to believe in the veracity of Kelley’s revelations and in her quality as the chosen revelation vessel. His confidence in the realm of magic contrasts with Shakespeare’s skeptical realism. Although familiar with the glorification of man in perennial philosophy, Shakespeare was not completely convinced of it, as can be seen in Hamlet, Act II:

What a job is a man! how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties! in shape and moving, how express and admirable! in action like an angel! in apprehension like a god! the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals! And yet what is this quintessence of dust for me?

Even though the playwright has a less enthusiastic view of human ability compared to the sorcerer, they share the awareness that words not only mean reality, but transform it as well. “Every word is a magic word,” said Aleister Crowley. Theater, philosophy and magic are different manifestations of the miraculous conflagrations of speech.

If I can add another link to the chain forged by the author, I would suggest that faith in the power of language is also shared by science, which through a network of symbols – both mathematical and verbal – develops and plans the construction of its own “magical artifacts” ie technology. Pico della Mirandola made a distinction between magia naturalis (white magic) and magia demoniaca (black magic). While the latter relies on the power of demons, the former is made possible by knowledge of the laws of nature and the ability to bend them to one’s will, much like science and technology.

On the other hand, whether it is a question of rituals, of concordance between the movement of the stars and human destiny, or of agreement between mathematical models and the behavior of objects, it is the same principle at work: an affinity between human conceptual models and how nature works. The extraordinary power of the scientific method is also its best argument: thanks to it, we have learned to fly and to eradicate diseases, for example. (To which we should add more damaging things, from pollution to weapons of mass destruction.) It’s magic that works pretty well, but why it remains a mystery.

In 1960, more than 300 years later Storm, the physicist and mathematician Eugene P. Wigner wrote a brief essay titled his thesis, “The Unreasonable Efficiency of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences”. I would like to think that Shakespeare and Dee would have agreed with the thesis of the essay.

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Francesco D’Isa is a philosopher and artist from Florence, Italy. He writes and draws for various magazines and is the editorial director of the Italian magazine L’Indiscreto.

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